Archives

Do you need psychology for social work?

You should be working in the social services field in a professional capacity and also get experience in research and research analysis. … A degree in Psychology can be an excellent path to becoming a social worker, provided you get the work experience you need to advance your degree. https://www.bestpsychologydegrees.com/faq/can-i-become-a-social-worker-with-a-degree-in-psychology/

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Social Work vs. Psychology

Both social work and psychology are fields that equip others with the necessary tools to help themselves. Social work and psychology are oriented towards the same outcome: recognizing and treating mental illness, and empowering individuals to improve their own lives. While they sometimes overlap and intersect, each profession approaches their work with individuals in a distinctive manner. […]

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Impact Statement – section8.scot

It’s now clear the children have been scarred by this experience and especially by the long delays and the court’s failure to provide them with relief from what they were experiencing. So much then for the principle that the best interests of children must be the paramount consideration in these cases. A Child Welfare Hearing […]

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Training

Training for Lawyers Lawyers here means solicitors, barristers and Legal Executives.  We have already highlighted the appalling level of ignorance amongst lawyers about PA.  As with CAFCASS officers, UKAP recommends a compulsory PA training module in the CPD (Continuing Professional Development) of all family lawyers.  Use our questionnaire when talking to lawyers.

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Health Education continued………………………

CAFCASS CAFCASS is a major source of injustice for children and APs.  Make no mistake about that. The reasons are these. Firstly, the training of CAFCASS officers is woeful.  Courses in PA are only optional.  And the uptake of these courses is lamentable – only 2% of caseworkers take this course (https://voiceofthechild.org.uk/kb/cafcass-parental-alienation-webinar-training/).  Well, Mr Douglas […]

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Stepping forward to 2020/21: The mental health workforce plan for England

Following graduation from undergraduate medical school, there are a number of points along the ‘pipeline’ for psychiatrists where potential supply can be lost: • Not enough newly qualified doctors choosing/able to train in psychiatry. In 2016, only 349 of the advertised 417 Core Psychiatry Training places were filled by a trainee (83%). The percentage of […]

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E-learning programmes on the e-LfH Hub

A comprehensive list of proposed e programmes offered by Health Education England Not one mention of anything relating to Parental Alienation, have we really moved any further forward??? HEE e-Learning for Healthcare: Planned Programmes to March 2021 List updated 11th August 2020 Programme name  No. of sessions (estimate) Launch date Deterioration 6  Autumn 2020 Emergency […]

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Psychiatric Social Workers

Psychiatric social workers may also be employed in outpatient centers, working with juveniles and adults. They perform psychotherapy and assessments, educate the patient and his or her family, and make referrals as necessary. Mental health therapies include more than just talk. Social workers may, for example, employ Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing with young trauma […]

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Social work education and training in mental health, addictions and suicide

Social workers are among the largest group of professionals in the mental health workforce and play a key role in the assessment of mental health, addictions and suicide. Most social workers provide services to individuals with mental health concerns, yet there are gaps in research on social work education and training programmes. The objective of […]

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“surveillance” of Facebook accounts was common

What The Times say is that the study they are referring to found ‘“surveillance” of Facebook accounts was common. Social workers used fake profiles to “friend” parents in cases where their posts were not publicly viewable. They watched parents’ relationships and behaviour, looking out for factors such as abusive partners or drug use. Oddly, I’ve been able to […]

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