Posted in child abuse and emotional abuse, Child abuse: Parental mental illness, learning disability, substance misuse, and domestic violence, Emotional child abuse Signs, On Child Abuse and Alienation, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Parental Alienation Is The Same As Child Abuse- Petition by Mark Edge

The International Journal -CHILD ABUSE & NEGLECT

Historically, child protection has been commonly perceived to be a matter of concern to professionals in specialized social service, health, mental health, and justice systems. However, Child Abuse & Neglect: The International Journal also welcomes contributors and readers interested in children’s safety in the settings of everyday life – homes, day care centers, schools, playgrounds, youth clubs, health clinics, places of worship, and so forth. Child Abuse & Neglect also invites the engagement of other social scientists (e.g., anthropologists, economists, historians, planners, political scientists, and sociologists) and humanists (e.g., ethicists, legal scholars, political theorists, and theologians) whose studies may contribute to an understanding of (a) the evolution of concepts of – and strategies for – child protection and (b) the responsibilities of individual adults and the institutions of which they are a part to ensure children’s safety and their humane care.

Limited by neither geography, profession, nor setting, the readers of Child Abuse & Neglect have diverse education, experience, interests, and needs for information. Accordingly, the journal seeks the expression of authors’ ideas and their empirical findings clearly and cogently, so that articles are accessible to a broad audience. The journal also expects authors to approach problems of child abuse and neglect with a level of care commensurate with the fundamental importance of children’s rights to the protection of their personal security, the promotion of their sense of dignity, and the assurance of love and respect in the relationships most important to them.

Toward those ends, Child Abuse & Neglect invites research and commentary on the following topics, among others:

•the conditions that foster or threaten children’s safety and sense of personal security in their homes and other settings of everyday life;

•the conditions that enable or hinder parents’, extended family members’, other caregivers’, and other community members’ efforts to ensure children’s personal security;

•programs and practices to facilitate children’s protection from harms or wrongs, their recovery from violations of their personal security, or both;

•community, societal, and international systems to promote children’s safety, enhance the quality of their care, and/or facilitate the mitigation of harms and wrongs that they may suffer;

•children’s, parents’, and other caregivers’ own experiences, attitudes, and beliefs in regard to all of these topics.

Child Abuse & Neglect recognizes that child protection is a global concern and that the state of the art continues to evolve. Accordingly, the journal is intended to be useful to scholars, policymakers, concerned citizens, and professional practitioners in countries that are diverse in wealth, culture, and the nature of their formal child protection system. Thus Child Abuse & Neglect welcomes contributions grounded in the traditions of particular cultures and settings. However, international and cross-cultural studies and commentary are of special interest.

The International Journal -CHILD ABUSE & NEGLECT

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Posted in BORDERLINE (EMOTIONALLY UNSTABLE) PERSONALITY DISORDER, BPD - The Emotionally Unstable, child abuse and emotional abuse, Child neglect and emotional abuse, Convergent Personality or Emotional Disorders, Emotional Abuse - parental alienation, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Psychopathy -Emotion recognition and empathy

Emotion recognition and empathy

Abnormal patterns of brain activity is observed in children with callous-unemotional and psychopathic traits when viewing others in painful situations

A large body of research suggests that psychopathy is associated with atypical responses to distress cues (e.g. facial and vocal expressions of fear and sadness), including decreased activation of the fusiform and extrastriate cortical regions, which may partly account for impaired recognition of and reduced autonomic responsiveness to expressions of fear, and impairments of empathy.[22] The underlying biological surfaces for processing expressions of happiness are functionally intact in psychopaths, although less responsive than those of controls. The neuroimaging literature is unclear as to whether deficits are specific to particular emotions such as fear. Some recent fMRI studies have reported that emotion perception deficits in psychopathy are pervasive across emotions (positives and negatives).[57][58][59][60][61] Studies on children with psychopathic tendencies have also shown such associations.[61][62][63][64][65][66] Meta-analyses have also found evidence of impairments in both vocal and facial emotional recognition for several emotions (i.e., not only fear and sadness) in both adults and children/adolescents.[67]

A recent study using offenders with psychopathy found that under certain circumstances they could willfully empathize with others. Functional neuroimaging was performed while the subjects were watching videos of a person harming another individual. While reduced empathic brain activation relative to the controls was observed in the control condition, the empathic reaction of the psychopathic offenders initiated the same way it did for controls when they were instructed to empathize with the harmed individual, and the area of the brain relating to pain was activated when the psychopathic offenders were asked to imagine how the harmed individual felt. The research suggests that individuals with psychopathy could switch empathy on at will, which would enable them to be both callous as well as charming. The team who conducted the study say it is still unknown how to transform this willful empathy into the spontaneous empathy most people have, though they propose it could be possible to bring psychopaths closer to rehabilitation by helping them to activate their “empathy switch”. Others suggested that despite the results of the study, it remained unclear whether the experience of empathy by these psychopathic individuals was the same as that of controls, and also questioned the possibility of devising therapeutic interventions that would make the empathic reactions more automatic.[68][69][70]

Work conducted by Jean Decety with large samples of incarcerated offenders with psychopathy offers additional insights. In one study, the offenders were scanned while viewing video clips depicting people being intentionally hurt. They were also tested on their responses to seeing short videos of facial expressions of pain. The participants in the high-psychopathy group exhibited significantly less activation in theventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala and periaqueductal gray parts of the brain, but more activity in the striatum and the insula when compared to control participants.[71] In a second study, the subjects with psychopathy exhibited a strong response in pain-affective brain regions when taking an imagine-self perspective, but failed to recruit the neural circuits that were activated in controls during an imagine-other perspective—in particular the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and amygdala—which may contribute to their lack of empathic concern.[72]

Despite studies suggesting deficits in emotion perception and imagining others in pain, professor Simon Baron-Cohen claims psychopathy is associated with intact cognitive empathy, which would imply an intact ability to read and respond to behaviors, social cues and what others are feeling. Psychopathy is, however, associated with impairment in the other major component of empathy—affective (emotional) empathy—which includes the ability to feel the suffering and emotions of others (what scientists would term as emotional contagion), and those with the condition are therefore not distressed by the suffering of their victims. Those with autism, on the other hand, often are impaired in both the affective and cognitive facets of empathy.[73]

Emotion recognition and empathy

Posted in Parental Alienation PA

The Top 5 Reasons I feel compelled to do something about Parental Alienation

It breaks children. Quite simply it is child abuse, but a big part of the problem is that most people don’t fully understand how detrimental it is not only to the families, but especially to the children caught in the middle. It’s not just the interfering between a child’s natural bond with one of the two people that a child is pre-programmed to love unconditionally—even though that in and of itself is enough cause for concern– but it’s the emotional and psychological manipulation of the child in forcing them to surrender to the disturbed alienating parent’s demands to disown the targeted parent that is most harmful. The demands to which the child yields to for the sake of self–preservation. Think about that for a second. A child is forced to say that they hate and/or fear a loving parent whom they naturally love completely and unconditionally. Otherwise they face the wrath of the alienating parent which includes verbal reproaches, withholding of affection, and the threat of losing the love and support of the only parent that they are allowed to have in their lives. Its equivalent to saying to a child, “You’ve lost that parent (whom I am not allowing you to see) already, do you also want to lose me? Where will you live? Who will take care of you? Realize that if you don’t surrender to my demands I WILL disown you!

read more here:

Posted in Parental Alienation PA

Types of ECA

When emotional abuse is shown in movies or TV programs, the abuser is often a huge, ugly, fierce-looking adult. The abuser never looks like the kind-faced person next door. The abuser is never an o…

Source: Types of ECA

Posted in Parental Alienation PA

Parental alienation and child abuse

Source: Parental alienation and child abuse

Posted in Adult Children of Parental Alienation - Resources, Adult Children of Parental Alienation Syndrome:, Aftermath of Parental Alienation, Alienation, child abuse and emotional abuse, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Parental Alienation & Victimhood, Parental alienation “horror show”, Parental Alienation PA, Parental Alienation Prevention Week April 20-26, Parentification, parents of estranged adult children, PAS, PAS expert professional, PAS: Child Abuse Case Seminar, Tales of parental alienation

#PAS ~ If It Was Terrorism Would The Governments Act?

Posted in child abuse and emotional abuse, crimes against children, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Parental Alienation & Victimhood, Parental alienation “horror show”, Parental Alienation PA, Parental Alienation Prevention Week April 20-26, Parentification, parents of estranged adult children, PAS, PAS expert professional, PAS: Child Abuse Case Seminar, Tales of parental alienation

Parental Alienation and Parental Kidnap to be recognised as crimes against children

Parental Alienation and Parental Kidnap infringe upon the rights of the child to know of its parentage and also exposes the child to potential emotional difficulties in later life, if the child is ever reconciled with the truth. Parental Alienation and Parental Kidnap serves only the emotional desires and wishes [not needs] of the custodial spouse, over the rights, needs and well-being of both the child and of the absent spouse and so, this is not prioritising the protection and the well-being of the child and is therefore in our opinion, a direct form of legalised child abuse.

CLICK THE LINK BELOW TO VOTE

http://www.3rdchamber.com/motion/240

Posted in Question on Adult PA, REJECTING OR ABUSIVE ALIENATING PARENT

Remarriage As A Trigger of Parental Alienation Syndrome

Maladaptive efforts to adjust to remarriage can provoke or exacerbate parental alienation syndrome. The remarried parent, the other parent, the stepparent, and the child each may contribute to the disturbance. Underlying dynamics include jealousy, narcissistic injury, desire for revenge, the wish to erase the exspouse from the child’s life in order to “make room” for the stepparent, competitive feelings between the exspouse and stepparent, the new couple’s attempt to unite around a common enemy and avoid recognition of conflicts in the marriage, the child’s attempt to resolve inner conflict, and parent-child boundary violations. These dynamics are discussed and suggestions for treatment are offered.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01926180050081667#.VRalhTHF-So

Love Yourself

Posted in Divorce, Divorce Poison

Divorce Casualties: Protecting Your Children from Parental Alienation By Douglas Darnall

Divorce Casualties helps parents recognize the often subtle causes of alienation and teaches them how to prevent or minimize its damaging effects. Dr. Darnall gives readers practical, specific techniques for recognizing and reversing the effects of alienation including a self-report inventory to help parents assess their own alienating behavior and exercises to help them understand and modify it.

https://books.google.fr/books?id=OVly9V5-EbYC&dq=Parental+Alienation+Awareness&lr=&source=gbs_navlinks_sDivorce Poison

Posted in PAS

EDUCATE THE WORLD ABOUT PARENTAL ALIENATION

15 janv. 2015 — From the 12th to the 30th of January 2015, the 18 members of the Committee on the Rights of the Child are in Geneva, Switzerland reviewing Nations compliance with the CRC. Besides the usual yearly request for a chunk percentage of your Nation budget, the Committee insist that Nations implant the CRC into Nations Constitution. Sadly, some countries have already done it!

https://www.change.org/p/u-n-recognize-parental-alienation-as-violence-and-abuse-againstchildren/u/9308661