Posted in Mindfulness Meditation

Mindfulness

The moment one gives close attention to anything,

even a blade of grass, it becomes a mysterious,

awesome, indescribably magnificent world in itself.

– Henry Miller –

Posted in Alienation, Recovery, Self Help

Mental Illness in Families

Mental illnesses in parents represent a risk for children in the family. These children have a higher risk for developing mental illnesses than other children. When both parents are mentally ill, the chance is even greater that the child might become mentally ill.

The risk is particularly strong when a parent has one or more of the following: Bipolar Disorder, an anxiety disorder, ADHD, schizophrenia, alcoholism or other drug abuse, or depression. Risk can be inherited from parents, through the genes.

An inconsistent, unpredictable family environment also contributes to psychiatric illness in children. Mental illness of a parent can put stress on the marriage and affect the parenting abilities of the couple, which in turn can harm the child.

Some protective factors that can decrease the risk to children include:

  • Knowledge that their parent(s) is ill and that they are not to blame
  • Help and support from family members
  • A stable home environment
  • Psychotherapy for the child and the parent(s)
  • A sense of being loved by the ill parent
  • A naturally stable personality in the child
  • Positive self esteem
  • Inner strength and good coping skills in the child
  • A strong relationship with a healthy adult
  • Friendships, positive peer relationships
  • Interest in and success at school
  • Healthy interests outside the home for the child
  • Help from outside the family to improve the family environment (for example, marital psychotherapy or parenting classes)

Medical, mental health or social service professionals working with mentally ill adults need to inquire about the children and adolescents, especially about their mental health and emotional development. If there are serious concerns or questions about a child, it may be helpful to have an evaluation by a qualified mental health professional. Continue reading “Mental Illness in Families”

Posted in Alienation, Recovery, Self Help

Emotion Regulation Without a Mature Prefrontal Cortex

We now know that the prefrontal cortex is one of the last brain regions to develop, and its connections with other cortical and subcortical targets are very slow to form. These processes are especially slow in the human, and evidence of continued development has been documented through adolescence and adulthood. This slow-paced and sustained development renders the prefrontal cortex and its connections vulnerable to environmental insults (e.g., early psychosocial adversity), but at the same time offers great potential for extensive learning from positive, enriching environments, and the optimization of neural processes that will facilitate regulated behavior. Its end-product is an incredibly rich emotional regulation repertoire in the mature adult. Continue reading “Emotion Regulation Without a Mature Prefrontal Cortex”

Posted in Alienation, Mindfulness Meditation

When science meets mindfulness

What scientists found was that mindfulness had a very positive effect particularly on three areas of the brain linked with our emotional centre (Baime, 2011; Ireland, 2014).

These three areas are the:

  • cortex: regulates thinking and reason (Graham, 2008) and is the part of our brain most recent to evolve – our ‘organ’ of consciousness and what makes us homo sapiens (McGill, n.d.)
  • hippocampus: integrates perceptions and emotions into memory, especially long-term memory​ (Siegel, 2015; Graham, 2008)
  • amygdale (there are two): respond to perceptions of fear and activate the ‘fight or flight’ mechanism (Graham, 2008) so whatever event stimulates the amygdale will surely cause a knee-jerk reaction​
Since the brain is highly complex and its complexities are way beyond my scope of knowledge, for the sake of understanding and simplification I’ll concentrate on these three areas as applied to trauma and human development.​

Continue reading “When science meets mindfulness”

Posted in Alienation, Recovery, Self Help

Stop the negative thoughts

Every word you say to yourself becomes a blueprint that your mind turns into a reality. Negative thoughts create a pattern of negative behavior. Stop the negative thinking now.

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Posted in Alienation, Recovery, Retreats, Self Help

HIP HACKS

Since HIP’s inception 10 years ago, HIP’s transformative lessons in Bias Reduction, Overcoming Bystander Effect and Growth Mindset have impacted to date 700 teachers and educators, 500 schools and 35,000 individuals across the world. Through its experiential training workshops, HIP serves approximately 10 high schools, 50 teachers and 3,000 individuals each year. HIP’s educational programs have impacted professors, college students, high school students, as well as, business leaders, company employees and staff from non-profit organizations and governmental agencies. In order to measure the success of our training, HIP works with our clients to conduct pre-assessment and post-assessment surveys and collect statistical and psychometric data that is used to assess and evaluate the short-term and long-term social impact of our programs. HIP has also inspired the creation of nearly 20 global HIP affiliated non-profit organizations in countries like Poland, Hungary, Czech Republic, Canada and Indonesia.

 

Continue reading “HIP HACKS”

Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, NLP, Parental Alienation PA, Recovery, Self Help

Automatic Negative Thoughts

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CBT can help you overcome those errors in reasoning that can lead to catastrophic thinking, which can lead to even more negative automatic thoughts.
Three-Step Process for Identifying Cognitive Distortions

Step 1 – Identifying Thoughts, Feelings and Behaviours

Step 2 – Understanding the Links Between Thoughts, Feelings and Behaviours

Step 3 – Making Behavioural Changes

Continue reading “Automatic Negative Thoughts”

Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, Parental Alienation PA, Recovery, Self Help

The relationship between resilience and mental health

Being mentally healthy doesn’t mean never going through bad times or experiencing emotional problems. We all go through disappointments, loss, and change. And while these are normal parts of life, they can still cause sadness, anxiety, and stress. But just as physically healthy people are better able to bounce back from illness or injury, people with strong mental health are better able to bounce back from adversity, trauma, and stress. This ability is called resilience.1

https://franceretreat.com/2018/09/20/the-relationship-between-resilience-and-mental-health/

Posted in Alienation

We want to set the record straight

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https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/XanUpMSHhBQ

Posted in Alienation

Psychology

Psychologists explore behavior and mental processes, including  perceptioncognitionattentionemotion (affect), intelligencephenomenologymotivation(conation), brain functioning, and personality. This extends to interaction between people, such as interpersonal relationships, including psychological resiliencefamily resilience, and other areas. Psychologists of diverse orientations also consider the unconscious mind.[3] Psychologists employ empirical methods to infer causal and correlational relationships between psychosocial variables. In addition, or in opposition, to employing empirical and deductive methods, some—especially clinical and counseling psychologists—at times rely upon symbolic interpretation and other inductive techniques. Psychology has been described as a “hub science” in that medicine tends to draw psychological research via neurology and psychiatry, whereas social sciences most commonly draws directly from sub-disciplines within psychology.[4]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Psychology

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