Posted in Alienation

EARLY IDENTIFICATION AND PREVENTION OF PARENT–CHILD ALIENATION

EARLY IDENTIFICATION AND PREVENTION OF PARENT–CHILD ALIENATION: A FRAMEWORK FOR BALANCING RISKS AND BENEFITS OF INTERVENTION

j.1744-1617.2009.01294.x_p1

Posted in Alienation

Off-putting relationships: the essentials of Child Alienation. By Nick Child

Berger and Wyse’s custardy-battle cartoon is an exception that proves the rule. There is no room for humour in the distress and tribal warfare of high conflict family separations.
No one would choose this if they could avoid it. I t is no fun for families or for those
who ride the wild waters of family separation to help them. Unless you’re only in it to make money, life jackets are essential.
Parental separation is now shown to be worse for children than is parental death (Otowa, 2014). Parental Alienation is a real and epidemic global pattern that affects society as a w
hole, not just individuals, couples and families (Harman & Biringen 2016). Yet by-
standing and ignorance is the default for those on the sidelines (von Friesen 2012).
read the full article here:- http://tinyurl.com/NickChildPA
Posted in Parental Alienation PA

Off-putting relationships: the essentials of Child Alienation By Nick Child

No joke
Berger and Wyse’s custardy-battle cartoon is an exception that proves the rule. There is no room for humour in the distress and tribal warfare of high conflict family separations
.
Parental separation is now shown to be worse for children than is parental death (Otowa, 2014) and parental alienation to be a real and epidemic pattern that affects society as a
whole, not just individuals, couples and families (Harman & Biringen 2016). No one woul
d choose this if they could avoid it. Nor is it fun for workers who ride the wild waters of family separation to help the families. Life jackets are essential.
This overview is an invitation to learn about a neglected but important field. The first half is an introduction with case examples. The second half summarises essential general points and issues, a life jacket to keep afloat. I start with the benefits of describing a spectrum over defining a syndrome, and end with how changing court practice might make the
biggest difference. The mismatch of our legal systems with our fast-changing society is as much a cause of high-conflict as the families are (Geldof, 2003).
Engaging with alienation
The word alienation by itself tends to alienate people. If we add capital letters,
plus the pointed word parental in front of it,and the static word syndrome after
it, it becomes Parental Alienation Syndrome (Gardner 1985). For sensitive Britis hprofessionals this foreign label may cause severe allergic reactions. I was only
cured recently.
Social psychologists have shown how socially engrained stereotypes help explain major mi
stakes like that (Harman & Biringen 2016 & TED talk https://youtu.be/v3YdldNXZnQ). It also helps to realise that Parental Alienation is just one of many harmful coercive and controlling family and non-family relationship patterns, all of which use similar kinds of undue influence. Undue influence includes: cults, terrorism, confidence-trickery as
well as domestic abuse and child abuse (Child 2016; OpenMindsFoundation.org).
A fair reason to avoid an off-putting term like alienation’ is to cut down any more alienation. But that is to forget that labels have various purposes that we use in a discriminating way. And anyway off-put ting things often have off-putting
names. For example, apart from being quicker, note that child abduction by a parent may
be no different in outcome to child alienation, yet the negative term ‘abduction’ has no detractors. If we routinely bracketed the two terms together–Parental Child Abduction and Alienation–that would trigger the best framework for thinking about Alienation on its own
(Child, 2015; Faulkner, 1999). See footnotes for more on diagnosis and labels.
Posted in Alienation

Parental Alienation and the Christian: My Story

Alienated Mom's Blog

I’d sure like to start this blog entry by saying that everything worked out for me in the end, but it didn’t. My story of parental alienation continues, sadly.

I was married back in the early eighties. My husband was a drug pusher and cheater, and that’s why I finally divorced  him.  Well, he also abused me physically, mentally, spiritually and emotionally. He cheated on me on our honeymoon, if you can believe it. So, after my patience and tolerance ran out after about three years of misery and infidelity, I left him, taking our two small kids with me.

And the hell began. He and his mother began lying about me, taking me to court time after time and filling the judges ears with lie after lie. My ex even had some of his drug pusher buddies ready to testify against me (liars!). When my kids went to visit him and his…

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