Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Recovery, Surviving, Surviving Parental Alienation!!, Surviving the Borderline Father:, Surviving the Narcissistic Parent

Breathing and releasing grief

Here’s the most interesting part – the deeper I explored what my body held through breathwork and body psychotherapy, the more I discovered what my thoughts, beliefs and judgements really were, and the more I came to realise there is no thought without an emotional and energetic correlative in the body. None of these processes exists without a correlation in our consciousness either. Since then I’ve read the great quantum science discoveries that reflect this, and so much more, but how nice it is to feel it in the body and my relationships. Continue reading “Breathing and releasing grief”

Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Recovery, Surviving, Surviving Parental Alienation!!, Surviving the Borderline Father:, Surviving the Narcissistic Parent, Tools for Recovery from Emotional Incest

DIFFERENT TYPES OF TRAUMA

DEVELOPMENTAL TRAUMA

POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER (PTSD)

Acute Stress Disorder 

COMPLEX PTSD

Continue reading “DIFFERENT TYPES OF TRAUMA”

Posted in 4 Forms of Borderline Personality Disorder, BORDERLINE (EMOTIONALLY UNSTABLE) PERSONALITY DISORDER, Borderline Personality Disorder, Fast facts on borderline personality disorder, Narcissistic and borderline personalities exist, Parental Alienation PA, Surviving the Borderline Father:

Children of parents with Borderline Personality Disorder

Children of mothers with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) are a disadvantaged group of children that are at risk for future psychopathology.  Crandell et al. (1997) demonstrated that, for these children, attachment status is not completely stable.

Some children are able to resolve early traumatic experiences and are able to obtain an ‘earned secure’ attachment status in adulthood. Adults with an earned secure status function comparably to adults who had secure attachment status as children (Crandell et al, 1997). These findings hold great promises for the prognosis of children of mothers with BPD. With adequate attention and intervention, there is hope that children of mothers with BPD will overcome the risks associated with this maternal psychopathology.

Have Your Parents Put You at Risk for Psychopathology

Posted in Surviving the Borderline Father:

Surviving the Borderline Father:

Growing up with one or more parents affected with BPD causes significant damage to the child’s sense of self. Relief can only be achieved by stopping the abuse. This is done by installing consistent boundaries that do not allow for this type of abuse. Once this is achieved, healing of the self can occur by recognizing the damage done by the abuse and recasting the relationship in more realistic terms.

The nub of the problem is that if you have been raised by a Borderline mother or father, these behavioral scenes are your normal. First you need to step outside the abusive relationship sufficiently to realize what’s been done to you. After all, children don’t ask for abuse from the people they love the most in this world. Then, psychotherapy can help with objectifying what’s going on, setting good limits, and being the best son or daughter that you choose to be under the circumstances.

It’s a fight that’s worth the effort.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-intelligent-divorce/201503/the-borderline-father