What Is a Psychotic Disorder?

Psychotic disorders are a group of serious illnesses that affect the mind. They make it hard for someone to think clearly, make good judgments, respond emotionally, communicate effectively, understand reality, and behave appropriately.

When symptoms are severe, people with psychotic disorders have trouble staying in touch with reality and often are unable to handle daily life. But even severe psychotic disorders usually can be treated.

Types

There are different types of psychotic disorders, including:

Schizophrenia: People with this illness have changes in behavior and other symptoms — such as delusions and hallucinations — that last longer than 6 months. It usually affects them at work or school, as well as their relationships. Know the early warning signs of schizophrenia.

Schizoaffective disorder: People have symptoms of both schizophrenia and a mood disorder, such as depression or bipolar disorder. Learn more about the symptoms of schizoaffective disorder.

Schizophreniform disorder: This includes symptoms of schizophrenia, but the symptoms last for a shorter time: between 1 and 6 months. Find out more on schizophreniform disorder symptoms to look for.

Brief psychotic disorder: People with this illness have a sudden, short period of psychotic behavior, often in response to a very stressful event, such as a death in the family. Recovery is often quick — usually less than a month. Get more information about the different forms of brief psychotic disorder.

Delusional disorder  The key symptom is having a delusion (a false, fixed belief) involving a real-life situation that could be true but isn’t, such as being followed, being plotted against, or having a disease. The delusion lasts for at least 1 month. Read more on the types of delusions.

Shared psychotic disorder (also called folie à deux): This illness happens when one person in a relationship has a delusion and the other person in the relationship adopts it, too. Learn more about shared psychotic disorder and how it develops.

Substance-induced psychotic disorder: This condition is caused by the use of or withdrawal from drugs, such as hallucinogens and crack cocaine, that cause hallucinations, delusions, or confused speech. Find out more on substance-induced psychosis and other causes of secondary psychosis.

Psychotic disorder due to another medical condition: Hallucinations, delusions, or other symptoms may happen because of another illness that affects brain function, such as a head injury or brain tumor.

Paraphrenia: This condition has symptoms similar to schizophrenia. It starts late in life, when people are elderly.

https://www.webmd.com/schizophrenia/guide/mental-health-psychotic-disorders

Excessive and even sophisticated acts of deception

New research provides evidence that individuals with psychopathic personality traits tend to be more successful at convincing others that they are remorseful and gaining their trust. The study has been published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences.

“People who show characteristics of a psychopathic personality have been described as exhibiting very contradictory qualities,” said study author Kristopher J. Brazil (@brazkris), a PhD candidate at Brock University.

“On the one hand, they are usually described as having a personality pathology — and rightfully so, since they routinely perpetuate self- and other-damaging behaviors. Words like ‘maladaptive,’ ‘disordered,’ and ‘dysfunctional’ are often used to describe those with psychopathic traits, implying that there is something wrong with them.”

Continue reading “Excessive and even sophisticated acts of deception”

Psychopaths are Better at Learning to Lie

Individuals with high levels of psychopathic traits are better at learning to lie than individuals who show few psychopathic traits, according to a study published in the open access journal Translational Psychiatry. The findings indicate that people with high psychopathic traits may not have a ‘natural’ capacity to lie better, but rather are better at learning how to lie, according to the researchers.

Dr. Tatia Lee and Dr. Robin Shao of the State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and the Laboratory of Neuropsychology at The University of Hong Kong found that after practicing a task that involved giving a series of truthful or untruthful responses about whether or not they recognized people in a collection of photographs, individuals with high levels of psychopathic traits were able to lie much more quickly than before practice. By contrast, individuals with low levels of psychopathic traits showed no improvement in their lying speed.

Continue reading “Psychopaths are Better at Learning to Lie”

The Psychopath, Sociopath, and Antisocial

Roots of the Disorder 

Are the psychopath, sociopath, and someone with Antisocial Personality Disorder one and the same? The DSM says “yes”. Scholars such as Robert Hare and Theodore Millon beg to differ. The psychopath has antisocial traits for sure but they are coupled with and enhanced by callousness, ruthlessness, extreme lack of empathy, deficient impulse control, deceitfulness, and sadism. 

Like other personality disorders, psychopathy becomes evident in early adolescence and is considered to be chronic. But unlike most other personality disorders, it is frequently ameliorated with age and tends to disappear altogether in by the fourth or fifth decade of life. This is because criminal behavior and substance abuse are both determinants of the disorders and behaviors more typical of young adults. 

“Always in conflict with authority and frequently on the run, psychopaths possess a limited time horizon and seldom make medium or long term plans. They are impulsive and reckless, aggressive, violent, irritable, and, sometimes, the captives of magical thinking, believing themselves to be immune to the consequences of their own actions. 

Thus, psychopaths often end up in jail, having repeatedly flouted social norms and codified laws. Partly to avoid this fate and evade the law and partly to extract material benefits from unsuspecting victims, psychopaths habitually lie, steal others’ identities, deceive, use aliases, and con for “personal profit or pleasure” as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual puts it.”

https://samvak.tripod.com/personalitydisorders16.html

Psychopaths are Deceitful

THEY’RE DECEITFUL

Psychopaths lie. They lie a lot.

Dr. Galperin states that psychopaths will “make up a story about who they are, […] a completely false identity that they create to hook people.” And they don’t just do it for kicks, they do it to further themselves in some way. Dr. Galperin explains that psychopaths will “put on a show to develop false relationships [in order to] accomplish their higher purpose.”

Online dating may be a quick way to fill up your roster with Saturday night possibilities, but it’s important you stay wary. You never know what online flame may just turn out to be a little more Norman Bates-y than you bargained for.

Think you may be caught in a psychopath’s web of lies? Listen for any signs of discrepancy. If you notice that certain things they say don’t match up with what they’ve told you before, take it as a serious warning. And run for the hills.

https://cbtpsychology.com/warning-signs-dealing-psychopath/

PSYCHOPATHS HAVE ZERO UNDERSTANDING OF EMOTION

Psychopaths simply cannot understand the basic nature of human emotion. It’s totally and utterly meaningless to them.

Dr. Galperin says that psychopaths are “hardwired this way. There is something missing in their brain. They can’t feel fear, they can’t feel love or compassion. When they marry, it’s not for love, it’s because they feel it’s convenient for them or it will help them achieve a goal.”

If that doesn’t sound like the perfect quality in a partner, what is?

A simple way to tell whether or not a person displays this symptom is to ask them when they last felt genuinely happy or sad. If their face goes blank for an inordinate amount of time, you should hear alarm bells going off.

https://cbtpsychology.com/warning-signs-dealing-psychopath/

The Hidden Suffering of the Psychopath

The life histories of psychopaths are often characterized by a chaotic family life, lack of parental attention and guidance, parental substance abuse and antisocial behavior, poor relationships, divorce, and adverse socioeconomic circumstances.4,5 These individuals may feel that they are prisoners of their own etiological determination and believe that they had, in comparison with normal people, fewer opportunities or advantages in life.

Despite their outward arrogance, psychopaths feel inferior to others and know they are stigmatized by their own behavior. Some psychopaths are superficially adapted to their environment and are even popular, but they feel they must carefully hide their true nature because it will not be acceptable to others. This leaves psychopaths with a difficult choice: adapt and participate in an empty, unreal life, or do not adapt and live a lonely life isolated from the social community. They see the love and friendship others share and feel dejected knowing they will never be part of it.

Psychopaths are known for needing excessive stimulation, but most foolhardy adventures only end in disillusionment because of conflicts with others and unrealistic expectations. Furthermore, many psychopaths are disheartened by their inability to control their sensation-seeking and are repeatedly confronted with their weaknesses. Although they may attempt to change, low fear response and associated inability to learn from experiences lead to repeated negative, frustrating, and depressing confrontations, including trouble with the justice system.

https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/view/what-lays-behind-the-hidden-suffering-of-the-psychopath

Antisocial personality disorder: prevention and management

Glossary 

Empathic dysfunction in psychopathic individuals

Introduction Psychopathy can be considered one of the prototypical disorders associated with empathic dysfunction. Reference to empathic dysfunction is part of the diagnostic criteria of psychopathy (Hare, 1991). The very ability to inflict serious harm to others repeatedly can be, and is (Hare, 1991), an indicator of a profound disturbance in an appropriate ‘empathic’ response to the suffering of another. The goal of this chapter will be to consider the nature of the empathic impairment in psychopathy. First, I will consider the disorder of psychopathy and the definition of empathy. Second, I will consider whether individuals with psychopathy are impaired in ‘cognitive empathy’ or Theory of Mind. Third, I will consider the cognitive and neural architecture mediating ‘emotional empathy’. Fourth, I will consider whether individuals with psychopathy are impaired in ‘emotional empathy’. The disorder of psychopathy The origins of the concept of psychopathy probably originate in the writings of Pritchard (1837); see Pichot (1978). Pritchard developed the concept of ‘moral insanity’ to account for socially damaging or irresponsible behaviour that was not associated with known forms of mental disorder. He attributed morally objectionable behaviour to be a consequence of a diseased ‘moral faculty’. While the notion of a ‘moral faculty’ has been dropped, modern psychiatric classifications such as the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (currently, DSM-IV) make reference to syndromes associated with high levels of antisocial behaviour: conduct disorder (CD) in children and antisocial personality disorder (APD) in adults. © Cambridge University Press 2007 and Cambridge University Press, 2009.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/285914913_Empathic_dysfunction_in_psychopathic_individuals

28 Questions That Reveal Whether Someone Has A ‘Dark Personality’

It’s one thing to define a new personality structure, but measuring it is another thing altogether. To this end, a team of psychologists led by Delroy Paulhus of the University of British Columbia in Canada developed a 28-item scale to measure the personality traits of narcissism, Machiavellianism, psychopathy, and sadism. Here is what they came up with. (Note that all statements are responded to on a 5-point, strongly disagree to strongly agree, scale.)

https://www.forbes.com/sites/traversmark/2020/08/03/28-questions-that-reveal-whether-someone-has-a-dark-personality/?sh=2d05ecb26559