Posted in Adultification, Borderline Personality Disorder, Dark Triad, Empath, Enabler, Machiavellianism, Oedipus Complex, PERSONALITY DISORDERS, Projection, Psychopath, PSYCHOPATHIC TRAITS

Types of Personality Disorders

DSM-5 groups the 10 types of personality disorders into 3 clusters (A, B, and C), based on similar characteristics. However, the clinical usefulness of these clusters has not been established.

Cluster A is characterized by appearing odd or eccentric. It includes the following personality disorders with their distinguishing features:

Overview of Cluster A Personality Disorders

Cluster B is characterized by appearing dramatic, emotional, or erratic. It includes the following personality disorders with their distinguishing features:

  • Antisocial: Social irresponsibility, disregard for others, deceitfulness, and manipulation of others for personal gain

  • Borderline: Intolerance of being alone and emotional dysregulation

  • Histrionic: Attention seeking

  • Narcissistic: Underlying dysregulated, fragile self-esteem and overt grandiosity

Overview of Cluster B Personality Disorders

Cluster C is characterized by appearing anxious or fearful. It includes the following personality disorders with their distinguishing features:

  • Avoidant: Avoidance of interpersonal contact due to rejection sensitivity

  • Dependent: Submissiveness and a need to be taken care of

  • Obsessive-compulsive: Perfectionism, rigidity, and obstinacy

Overview of Cluster C Personality Disorders

Symptoms and Signs

According to DSM-5, personality disorders are primarily problems with

  • Self-identity

  • Interpersonal functioning

Self-identity problems may manifest as an unstable self-image (eg, people fluctuate between seeing themselves as kind or cruel) or as inconsistencies in values, goals, and appearance (eg, people are deeply religious while in church but profane and disrespectful elsewhere).

Interpersonal functioning problems typically manifest as failing to develop or sustain close relationships and/or being insensitive to others (eg, unable to empathize).

People with personality disorders often seem inconsistent, confusing, and frustrating to people around them (including clinicians). These people may have difficulty knowing the boundaries between themselves and others. Their self-esteem may be inappropriately high or low. They may have inconsistent, detached, overemotional, abusive, or irresponsible styles of parenting, which can lead to physical and mental problems in their spouse or children.

People with personality disorders may not recognize that they have problems.

Continue reading “Types of Personality Disorders”

Posted in Adultification, Borderline Personality Disorder, Dark Triad, Empath, Enabler, Machiavellianism, Oedipus Complex, PERSONALITY DISORDERS, Projection, Psychopath, PSYCHOPATHIC TRAITS, Sociopath

Diagnostic Taxonomy / 15 Personality Spectra

The Millon Fifteen Personality Styles/Disorders and Subtypes

The following lists the most recent and complete of the 15 normal and abnormal personalities derived from the Millon Evolutionary Theory. Each includes first the normal prototype or personality style (e.g., retiring), and second, the abnormal prototype or personality disorder (e.g., schizoid).

Continue reading “Diagnostic Taxonomy / 15 Personality Spectra”

Posted in Adultification, Borderline Personality Disorder, Dark Triad, Empath, Enabler, Machiavellianism, Oedipus Complex, PERSONALITY DISORDERS, Projection, Psychopath, PSYCHOPATHIC TRAITS, Sociopath

Personality Disorders in Modern Life, 2nd Edition

Abnormal Behavior and Personality 3

Early Perspectives on the Personality Disorders 14

The Biological Perspective 17

The Psychodynamic Perspective 22

Summary 35

CHAPTER2 PERSONALITY DISORDERS: CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVES 38

The Interpersonal Perspective 39

The Cognitive Perspective 48

Trait and Factorial Perspectives 54

The Evolutionary-Neurodevelopmental Perspective 57

Summary 72

CHAPTER3 DEVELOPMENT OF PERSONALITY DISORDERS 74

On the Interactive Nature of Developmental Pathogenesis 77

Pathogenic Biological Factors 78

Pathogenic Experiential History 88

Sources of Pathogenic Learning 90

Continuity of Early Learnings 101

Sociocultural Influences 112

Summary 116

CHAPTER4 ASSESSMENT AND THERAPY OF THE PERSONALITY DISORDERS 117

The Assessment of Personality 118

Psychotherapy of the Personality Disorders 134

Summary 147

CHAPTER5 THE ANTISOCIAL PERSONALITY 150

From Normality to Abnormality 155

Variations of the Antisocial Personality 158

Early Historical Forerunners 161

The Biological Perspective 162

The Psychodynamic Perspective 166

The Interpersonal Perspective 168

The Cognitive Perspective 172

The Evolutionary-Neurodevelopmental Perspective 175

Therapy 182

Summary 184

CHAPTER6 THE AVOIDANT PERSONALITY 187

From Normality to Abnormality 191

Variations of the Avoidant Personality 193

Early Historical Forerunners 198

The Biological Perspective 198

The Psychodynamic Perspective 201

The Interpersonal Perspective 203

The Cognitive Perspective 206

The Evolutionary-Neurodevelopmental Perspective 210

Therapy 217

Summary 220

CHAPTER7 THE OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE PERSONALITY 223

From Normality to Abnormality 227

Variations of the Compulsive Personality 229

Early Historical Forerunners 235

The Psychodynamic Perspective 236

The Interpersonal Perspective 240

The Cognitive Perspective 244

The Evolutionary-Neurodevelopmental Perspective 247

Therapy 255

Summary 257

CHAPTER8 THE DEPENDENT PERSONALITY 259

From Normality to Abnormality 263

Variations of the Dependent Personality 265

Early Historical Forerunners 268

The Psychodynamic Perspective 270

The Interpersonal Perspective 273

The Cognitive Perspective 275

The Evolutionary-Neurodevelopmental Perspective 278

Therapy 284

Summary 289

CHAPTER9 THE HISTRIONIC PERSONALITY 292

From Normality to Abnormality 295

Variations of the Histrionic Personality 297

Early Historical Forerunners 301

The Biological Perspective 302

The Psychodynamic Perspective 304

The Interpersonal Perspective 311

The Cognitive Perspective 315

The Evolutionary-Neurodevelopmental Perspective 318

Therapy 324

Summary 327

CHAPTER 10 THE NARCISSISTIC PERSONALITY 330

From Normality to Abnormality 333

Variations of the Narcissistic Personality 337

Early Historical Forerunners 342

The Biological Perspective 343

The Psychodynamic Perspective 343

The Interpersonal Perspective 349

The Cognitive Perspective 355

The Evolutionary-Neurodevelopmental Perspective 358

Therapy 366

Summary 369

CHAPTER 11 THE SCHIZOID PERSONALITY 371

From Normality to Abnormality 376

Variations of the Schizoid Personality 377

The Biological Perspective 380

The Psychodynamic Perspective 383

The Interpersonal Perspective 386

The Cognitive Perspective 390

The Evolutionary-Neurodevelopmental Perspective 392

Therapy 398

Summary 401

CHAPTER 12 THE SCHIZOTYPAL PERSONALITY 403

From Normality to Abnormality 408

Variations of the Schizotypal Personality 409

Early Historical Forerunners 412

The Biological Perspective 414

The Psychodynamic Perspective 416

The Interpersonal Perspective 419

The Cognitive Perspective 423

The Evolutionary-Neurodevelopmental Perspective 425

Therapy 430

Summary 433

CHAPTER 13 THE PARANOID PERSONALITY 435

From Normality to Abnormality 439

Variations of the Paranoid Personality 442

Early Historical Forerunners 445

The Biological Perspective 448

The Psychodynamic Perspective 449

The Interpersonal Perspective 455

The Cognitive Perspective 458

The Evolutionary-Neurodevelopmental Perspective 463

Therapy 471

Summary 475

CHAPTER 14 THE BORDERLINE PERSONALITY 477

From Normality to Abnormality 481

Variations of the Borderline Personality 482

The Biological Perspective 488

The Psychodynamic Perspective 490

The Interpersonal Perspective 495

The Cognitive Perspective 502

The Evolutionary-Neurodevelopmental Perspective 505

Therapy 511

Summary 516

CHAPTER 15 PERSONALITY DISORDERS FROM THE APPENDICES OF DSM-III-R AND DSM-IV 519

The Self-Defeating (Masochistic) Personality 520

The Sadistic Personality 530

The Depressive Personality 539

The Negativistic (Passive-Aggressive) Personality 548

 

Continue reading “Personality Disorders in Modern Life, 2nd Edition”

Posted in Adultification, Alienation

Shared Parenting After Parental Separation: The Views of 12 Experts

This article summarizes panel discussions that took place at an international conference on shared parenting (SP) held in May 2017. The panelists were internationally recognized experts on the legal and psychological implications of custody arrangements and parenting plans. Seven broad themes dominated the discussions: whether or not there was persuasive evidence that SP provides real benefits to children whose parents separate; what specific factors make SP beneficial; what symbolic value SP might have; whether there should be a legal presumption in favor of SP, and if so, what factors should make for exceptions; whether high parental conflict, parents’ failure to agree on the parenting plan, or dynamics of parental alienation should preclude SP; and what should happen when a parent wants to relocate away from the other parent.

Continue reading “Shared Parenting After Parental Separation: The Views of 12 Experts”

Posted in Adultification, Divorce, Infantilization, Parentification

Family Court Review

When caregivers conflict, systemic alliances shift and healthy parent-child roles can be corrupted. The present paper describes three forms of role corruption which can occur within the enmeshed dyad and as the common complement of alienation and estrangement. These include the child who is prematurely promoted to serve as a parent’s ally and partner, the child who is inducted into service as the parent’s caregiver, and the child whose development is inhibited by a parent who needs to be needed. These dynamics—adultification, parentification and infantilization, respectively—are each illustrated with brief case material. Family law professionals and clinicians alike are encouraged to conceptualize these dynamics as they occur within an imbalanced family system and thereby to craft interventions which intend to re-establish healthy roles. Some such interventions are reviewed and presented as one part of the constellation of services necessary for the triangulated child.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1744-1617.2011.01374.x/abstract;jsessionid=50ABA06D835CA6E5A094A90463033122.f02t04?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=false

Caring and Sharing