Posted in child abuse and emotional abuse, Parental Alienation – Westermarck effect, Parental alienation “horror show”, Parental Alienation Outcomes, Parental Alienation PA, Parental Alienation Prevention Week April 20-26, PARENTAL ALIENATION STORY - How it all started, Parental Alienation Study Group, Parental Alienation Syndrome – Definition, Parental Alienation: A Mental Diagnosis?, Parentification

The debate around the inclusion of Parental Alienation in DSM-5

Trainee Prize Award Winner
Psychopathology and theconceptualisation of mental disorder:The debate around the inclusion of Parental Alienation in DSM-5
Sue Whitcombe
Content and Focus:
This paper will briefly consider the general conceptualisation of mental disorder before focusing on the specific case of Parental Alienation (PA), variously termed a disorder or a syndrome.By virtue of the recent debate surrounding its potential inclusion in the newest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), this is a topical example. A critical analysis of the petition for its inclusion within DSM-5 will both highlight the range of professionals’ views, and also consider ethical and practical issues inherent in the conceptualisation of a mental disorder and its classification within the evolving DSM. Following this general and specific conceptualisation of mental disorder, the tensions that diagnosis raises for counselling psychology will be briefly deliberated. The positive aspects of classification and diagnosis will be acknowledged, whilst highlighting the focus on the subjective experience of individual clients.
Conclusions:
Despite the controversy about the concept, validity and reliability of PA, the evidence suggests that there is more agreement than disagreement among practitioners and professionals in the field. Whilst there is a general consensus that alienation exists within a distinct population who would benefit from intervention, there is no consensus on its inclusion in DSM-5. Irrespective of its inclusion in any nosology,the recent debate has highlighted the need for further research. A greater understanding of the processes,symptoms and behaviours involved in PA will enable the needs of children and families involved in high- conflict separation to be better addressed.

https://www.academia.edu/4552589/Psychopathology_and_the_conceptualisation_of_mental_disorder_The_debate_around_the_inclusion_of_Parental_Alienation_in_DSM-5

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Posted in Parental Alienation Syndrome – Definition

Parental Alienation Syndrome – Definition

There are many definitions by many professionals.

You can do an Internet search to see many more definitions. Dr. Richard A. Gardner’s definition is not quoted here as the Justice Sheppard definition is 100% based on it. Last updates included the modified Childress definition. Childress (2014) (Modified)1

The presence in the child’s symptom display of three specific diagnostic indicators that represents definitive clinical evidence for the presence of pathogenic parenting practices by the allied and supposedly “favoured” parent (or carer) that are directly responsible for the child’s symptomatic cut-off of a relationship with the other parent (or parents)

1. Attachment system suppression

2. Personality disorder symptoms

3. Delusional belief system Stephens (modified)2 A condition that arises as a result of a distinctive form of psychological injury to children in high conflict divorce or other custody matters. It occurs when the child becomes aligned with one parent (or carer) as a result of the unjustified and/or exaggerated denigration of the other parent (or parents).

Stephens (modified)2 A condition that arises as a result of a distinctive form of psychological injury to children in high conflict divorce or other custody matters. It occurs when the child becomes aligned with one parent (or carer) as a result of the unjustified and/or exaggerated denigration of the other parent (or parents).

APS Parental Alienation Syndrome is a combination of two or more psychological conditions with a life long effect on a person that experienced parental alienation3 as a child. The recognised conditions4 involved may be (but are not limited to) delusional symptoms in partner of individual with delusional disorder (better known as shared psychotic disorder or folie a deux), factitious disorder imposed on another, Child affected by parental relationship distress, Parent-child relational problem.

see more   http://pa.aps.ie/1page/1%20Page%20PAS%20Definition.pdf