Emotional Incest Category

WHY SOME PARENTS LOOK TO CHILDREN FOR SUPPORT

It is thought that early emotional deprivation can lead some adults to regard their children as parental figures (Jurkovic, 2014). When divorce occurs, this can leave a vacuum that encourages a child to step in and do what they can to help the family (Freud, 1989). Parents with narcissistic personality (NPD) may lack insight into how their […]

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Emotional incest

Emotional incest occurs when the child believes they are responsible for their parent’s emotional well-being. This can happen when the parent talks to the child as though the child were an adult. The parent may request advice from the child regarding adult issues and can even place the child in the role of therapist. When […]

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Can of Worms? Pandora’s Box? Divulging Your Dark Secrets

What I regularly tell clients with such fears is that if they’re not yet ready to bring something up, then—by all means—don’t. But I also assure them that chances are that when they’re ready to disclose their zealously guarded secret, they’ll likely discover they’re actually not opening a can of worms at all (and certainly […]

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Judith Lewis Herman > Quotes

  “..[The] disclosure of the incest secret initiates a profound crisis for the family usually…the abuse has been going on for a number of years and has become an integral part of family life. Disclosure disrupts whatever fragile equilibrium has been maintained, jeopardizes the functioning of all family members, increases the likelihood of violent and […]

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The incestuous family

“Through an intensive clinical study of forty incest victims and numerous interviews with professionals in mental health, child protection, and law enforcement, Judith Herman develops a composite picture of the incestuous family. In a new afterword written especially for this edition, Herman offers an overview of the knowledge that has developed about incest and other […]

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Judith Herman

Judith Herman is best known for her contributions to the understanding of trauma and its victims, as set out in her second book, Trauma and Recovery.[2] There she distinguishes between single-incident traumas – one-off events – which she termed Type I traumas, and complex or repeated traumas (Type II).[3] Type I trauma, according to the United States Veterans Administration’s Center […]

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Effect of child abuse on the stages of behavioural development

Infancy: Infancy is a critical period in a child’s development. During infancy, the brain, which is approximately one-quarter of the size of the adult brain, is one of the most undeveloped organs and it is highly susceptible to both the positive and the negative effects of the external environment. For instance, shaken baby syndrome, a […]

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How to Identify a Child Who Is Being Emotionally Abused

Mandated reporters are persons who encounter the child as part of their occupation, including child daycare providers, educators, legal and law enforcement personnel, and medical personnel. These reporters have just as much of an obligation to report suspected emotional abuse as they do physical or sexual abuse or neglect—it should be taken just as seriously. […]

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Grandfather inappropriateness

Usually, inappropriateness is a sign of frontotemporal dementias – FTD, and not the nice flower people. I would definitely talk with your neurologist about this – it may be time to reevaluate therapeutic options. https://www.lbda.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?

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Chase and Statham (2005)

Chase and Statham (2005) identified a four stage continuum to the grooming process: stage 1: identify the vulnerable child, stage 2: socially isolate the child, stage 3: develop an emotional attachment, and stage 4: isolate the child from their families and develop progressive control over the child. The study of child sex offenders by Elliott, Browne, and Kilcoyne (1995) demonstrated how groomers looked […]

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