Delusional Disorder and Addiction to Alcohol

Delusional disorder, also known as paranoia disorder, is a relatively uncommon condition. Delusional disorder patients have delusions but do not have hallucinations, mood or thought disturbances, or any primary signs of mental illnesses such as schizophrenia.

These delusions are also another type of insanity in which a person believes that something has happened, ( will happen or is happening) that is not true. These delusions are often delusional – for example, the individual might believe they are being watched. Delusional disorder does not necessarily make it difficult for a person to act normally, but it has the potential to do so. Delusional disorder is divided into many subtypes.

https://dualdiagnosis.org/delusional-disorder-and-abuse/

Dissociative identity disorder (DID)

Dissociative identity disorder (DID), previously known as multiple personality disorder(MPD), is a mental disorder characterized by the maintenance of at least two distinct and relatively enduring personality states. The disorder is accompanied by memory gaps beyond what would be explained by ordinary forgetfulness.

Mental health professionals recognise four main types of dissociative disorder, including:

  • Dissociative amnesia.
  • Dissociative fugue.
  • Depersonalisation disorder.
  • Dissociative identity disorder.

The Disturbing Link Between Narcissism and Sadism

So why are some narcissists sadistic and others not? In my clinical experience, I have found that sadistic narcissists were more seriously neglected or emotionally abused in childhood than other narcissists. Many narcissists are difficult to get along with, have a grandiose sense of self, and won’t take accountability for their actions, but they don’t have a driving need to punish others. I have found that the sadistic narcissist has lower self-esteem than the non-sadistic narcissist, even though neither truly has high self-esteem. The most important point to understand is that the drive to punish or upset others on a regular basis typically stems from an individual having been on the receiving end of confusing, mind-twisting behavior from a parent early in life.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/insight-is-2020/201607/the-disturbing-link-between-narcissism-and-sadism

No inhibitions, no moral sense, and no social structure

Within the DSM-IV-TR, the criteria for antisocial personality read:
A. There is a pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of
others occurring since age 15 years, as indicated by three (or more) of the
following:

Failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors as indicated
by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest.
2). Deceitfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, or conning others
for personal profit or pleasure.

  • Impulsivity or failure to plan ahead.
  • Irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or
    assaults.
  • Reckless disregard for safety of self or others.
  • Consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure to sustain consistent
    work behavior or honor financial obligations.
  • Lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having
    hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another.
  • The individual is at least age 18 years.
  • There is evidence of Conduct Disorder with onset before age 15 years.
  • The occurrence of antisocial behavior is not exclusively during the course of
    Schizophrenia or a Manic Episode (American Psychiatric Association, 2000).


Although these criteria are often seen in both sociopaths and psychopaths, there
exists an argument that sociopathology, psychopathology and antisocial personality
disorder by themselves are their own individual personality disorders (Hare, Hart &
Harpur, 1991)

https://scholarworks.smith.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1570&context=theses

Haltlose personality disorder

Haltlose personality disorder is an ICD-10 personality disorder[27] in which affected individuals possess psychopathic traits built upon short-sighted selfishness[20] and irresponsible hedonism, combined with an inability to anchor one’s identity to a future or past.[28][29] The symptoms of Haltlose share similarites with frontal lobe syndromesociopathic and histrionic personality traits,[28][30] and are characterized by a lack of inhibition[31] and “the immaturity of moral and volitional qualities…and the absence of positive ethical attitudes.”[32]

Described by Emil Kraepelin and Gustav Aschaffenburg in the early twentieth century as one of seven classes of psychopath,[33][34][35] and further distinguished by Karl JaspersEugen and Manfred Bleuler, it has been colloquially dubbed psychopathy with an “absence of intent or lack of will”.[3]

With other hyperthymics, Haltlose personalities were considered to make up “the main component of serious crime”,[21] and are studied as one of the strains of psychopathy relevant to criminology[36][37][38] as they are “very easily involved in the criminal history”[39] and may become aggressors[4][40] or homicidal.[41] A 2020 characterization of psychopathies noted of the Haltlose that “these people constantly need vigilant control, leadership, authoritarian mentor, encouragement and behavior correction” to avoid an idle lifestyle, involvement in antisocial groups, crime and substance abuse.[32][42] The marked tendencies towards suggestibility are off-set by demonstrations of “abnormal rigidity and intransigence and firmness”.[43]

After discovering a guilty conscience due to some act or omission they have committed, “they then live under constant fear of the consequences of their action or inaction, fear of something bad that might strike them” in stark opposition to their apparent carelessness or hyperthymic temperament,[44] which is itself frequently a subconscious reaction to overwhelming fear.[9] They frequently withdraw from society.[45] Given their tendency to “exaggerate, to embroider their narratives, to picture themselves in ideal situations, to invent stories”,[25] this fear then manifests as being “apt to blame others for their offences, frequently seeking to avoid responsibility for their actions”.[46] They do not hold themselves responsible for their failed life, instead identifying as an ill-treated martyr.[20]

They were characterized as Dégénérés supérieurs,[13] demonstrating normal or heightened intellect but degraded moral standards.[47] Of the ten types of psychopaths defined by Schneider, only the Gemutlose (compassionless) and the Haltlose “had high levels of criminal behavior” without external influence, and thus made up the minority of psychopaths who are “virtually doomed to commit crimes” by virtue only of their own constitution.[48] Frequently changing their determined goals,[9] a haltlose psychopath is “constantly looking for an external hold, it doesn’t really matter whether they join occult or fascist movements”.[49] The ability to moderate external influence was considered one of three characteristics necessary to form an overall personality, thus leaving Haltlose patients without a functional personality of their own.[50] A study of those with haltlose personality disorder concludes “In all of those cases, the result was a continuous social decline that ended in asocial-parasitic existence or an antisocial-criminal life”.[48][51][52]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haltlose_personality_disorder

“Dissociative Identity Disorder” (DID) by the American Psychiatric Association

Research repeatedly finds that typical highly-dissociated (“fragmented”) people were subjected to extreme neglect, abuse, abandonment, or other trauma as young children. Their nurturance deprivations were profound. The great majority of us don’t have anywhere close to this degree of personality splitting – and do have some.

Psychological Characteristics of Alienating Parent

Parent Alienation Syndrome occurs when individuals who have certain psychological characteristics manage internal conflict or pain by transforming psychological pain into interpersonal conflict. Divorcing parents often experience humiliation, loss of self-esteem, guilt, ambivalence, fear, abandonment anxiety, jealousy, or intense anger. These normal but very painful emotions must be managed. Usually people in crisis rely on characteristic relationship styles and pain management techniques. The Team has found alienating parents to have the following characteristics:

1. A narcissistic or paranoid orientation to interactions and relationships with others, usually as the result of a personality disorder.(2) Both narcissistic and paranoid relationships are maintained by identification, rather than mutual appreciation and enjoyment of differences as well as similarities. Perfectionism and intolerance of personal flaws in self or others have deleterious effects on relationships. When others disagree, narcissistic and paranoid people feel abandoned, betrayed, and often rageful.

2. Reliance on defenses against psychological pain that result in externalizing unwanted or unacceptable feelings, ideas, attitudes, and responsibility for misfortunes so that more painful internal conflict is transformed into less painful interpersonal conflict. Examples of such defenses are phobias, projection, “splitting,” or obsessive preoccupation with the shortcomings of others in order to obscure from self and others the individual’s own shortcomings. “Splitting” results when feelings, judgments, or characteristics are polarized into opposite, exhaustive, and mutually exclusive categories (such as all good or all bad, right or wrong, love or hate, victim or perpetrator), then are assigned or directed separately to self and other. (I am good, you are bad.) The need for such defenses arises because alienating parents have little or no tolerance for internal conflict or even normal ambivalence. The interpersonal result of such defenses is intense interpersonal conflict.(3)

3. Evidence of an abnormal grieving process such that there is a preponderance of anger and an absence of sadness in reaction to the loss of the marital partner

4. A family history in which there is an absence of awareness of normal ambivalence and conflict about parents, enmeshment, or failure to differentiate and emancipate from parents; or a family culture in which “splitting” or externalizing is a prominent feature. Some alienating parents were raised in families in which there is unresolved or unacknowledged grief as the result of traumatic losses or of severe but unacknowledged emotional deprivation, usually in the form of absence of empathy. More frequently, alienating parents were favorite children or were overly indulged or idealized as children.

https://mkg4583.wordpress.com/2010/08/19/identifying-cases-of-parent-alienation-syndrome-part-ii-by-leona-m-kopetski/

What goes on in the mind of the Parental Alienator?

If we were to get into the mind of the alienator we would find some very sick and disorganized psychopathology. (typically a narcissistic/borderline and for men accompanied by psychopathy and a persecutory delusional system, for women a narcissistic/borderline and/or histrionic features). These people, both men and, women, were arrested at a very early stage of development. There are no/weak boundaries, impoverished ego strength, weak impulse control and reduced and sometimes delusional reality testing. Their path through life often carries that of a persecutory delusion-that is, they are the victim of a punishing parent and then an evil spouse and world. To them, everything is everyone else’s fault; they take no ownership for their behavior unless it glorifies them.  In fact, the rules that exist apply to everyone but them and following an illegal path is not unusual, especially in cases where psychopathy occurs (typically more in men). The typical dynamic is that of the narcissist/borderline where their sense of entitlement governs their behavior- a sense that is really to counteract the deep feelings of low self-esteem, unworthiness and, powerlessness.

Narcissists, being remarkably resistant in treatment, are often unable to “get it” and cannot see what helping professional, judges and authority figures during the divorce are telling them: they are right and everyone else is wrong. Their need to vindicate themselves and see themselves as the perfect parent is a strong survival issue and they will go to any lengths to do that, even it means hurting the child in the process.

That said, these parents who pretend to be perfect show themselves in the legal system. They ask for  more visitation, sometimes 100% visitation (finding any reason for the child not to visit), ask the child to testify (“hear my child, hear me”), cut off communication and show no co-parenting, cooperation and accountability with the targeted parent yet firmly adhere to the notion that they strongly encouraged visitation and the child refused.

One parent even sent the judge texts where he attempted to turn the child away (who was not yet turned away) that had harsh denigrating language about the other parent; in this case, the delusional system was so strong that he was even unable to see that this would work against him.  There is no end to their mission. Unfortunately, this is not a custody issue but a child protective issue; it is an issue of child abuse. https://drbarbarawinter.com/2015/03/01/parental-alienation-2-when-your-child-turns-away-inside-the-mind-of-the-alienator/

Parental Psychological Control

 Parenting aggression can take on different forms, such as physical aggression, verbal aggression, and psychological aggression (Straus, Hamby, Finkelhor, Moore, & Runyan, 1998), and one key form of psychological aggression which is understudied is psychological control. Parental psychological control refers to parental behaviors that are intrusive and manipulative, undermining child autonomy, and characterized by guilt induction, love withdrawal, instilling anxiety, and verbal constraint (Barber, 1996;Barber & Harmon, 2002;Schaefer, 1965). In guilt induction, parents coerce children into complying with parental demands by making children feel guilty. …
… Parental psychological control has been linked to various forms of child maladjustment, including lower self-esteem, internalizing symptoms, and externalizing symptoms (Barber, 1996;Barber, Olsen, & Shagle, 1994;Barber, Stolz, Olsen, Collins, & Burchinal, 2005). For example, parental psychological control predicted adolescent depression and antisocial behaviors even after controlling for parental support and behavioral control (Barber et al., 2005). …
… Children’s theory of mind does not develop until around 4 years old (Wellman, Cross, & Watson, 2001) and self-conscious emotions do not develop until around 2 years old (Muris & Meesters, 2014). This is consistent with previous research that documented the adverse effect of parental psychological control behaviors primarily in middle childhood and adolescence (Barber, 1996;Barber et al., 1994;Barber et al., 2005;Soenens & Vansteenkiste, 2010). Future research with larger samples should examine whether child age moderates the association between parental psychological control and child maladjustment. …

Continue reading “Parental Psychological Control”

Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy 

Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy ® publishes empirical research on the psychological effects of trauma. The journal is intended to be a forum for an interdisciplinary discussion on trauma, blending science, theory, practice, and policy.

The journal publishes empirical research on a wide range of trauma-related topics, including

  • Psychological treatments and effects
  • Promotion of education about effects of and treatment for trauma
  • Assessment and diagnosis of trauma
  • Pathophysiology of trauma reactions
  • Health services (delivery of services to trauma populations)
  • Epidemiological studies and risk factor studies
  • Neuroimaging studies
  • Trauma and cultural competence

The journal publishes articles that use experimental and correlational methods and qualitative analyses, if applicable.

All research reports should reflect methodologically rigorous designs that aim to significantly enhance the field’s understanding of trauma. Such reports should be based on good theoretical foundations and integrate theory and data. Manuscripts should be of sufficient length to ensure theoretical and methodological competence. Continue reading “Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy “