Posted in #child alienation, #Complex Trauma, #Narcopath, #Pathogenic Parenting, 3 Hidden Weapons of Parental Alienation, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Mind control Poisonous pedagogy

Poisonous pedagogy

Poisonous pedagogy is mind control applied to toddlers and infants in the form of coercive “education”.

In 1977 Katharina Rutschky collected 600 pages of documents on child raring from 3 centuries. [12] The techniques and beliefs characteristic for poisonous pedagogy were later “rediscovered” to be effective for changing beliefs in adults when Lifton (Brainwashing in China) investigated brainwashing in POWs in Korea and Chinese thought reform.

The authors recommend traumatizing toddlers, because it is effective in breaking down resistance and mental functions and because “educators” need not fear revenge. Adults won’t remember what happened to them at an early age, they argue. [13] [14]

Making children watch beheadings, secessions, “teaching” them fear of death and illnesses, guilt and shame trips, harsh punishment, withholding love, rewards and affection, forced confessions and humiliations “can lead to a new world in 20 years” (J.B. Schupp, 1667, in[12])

Teaching submission and breaking the will of a child in the first year of life has been universally recommended in these documents. It was widely believed that children are born with “bad” traits like willfulness, wickedness, egotism, impurity, immorality, “sinfulness”, precociousness, smugness and a host of other projections. [12] These traits must be “driven out” by education and force, otherwise these traits will “torment their parents”. Own thinking or judgment is discouraged or even denied.[12]

A child was seen as starting out at a savage level, uncivilized, and must be shaped, tamed and molded to “fit in” or to develop superior qualities of civilization. In reality the rigorous training served the narcissistic needs of parents and preserved power structures in religion and society. [11]

The procedures proposed by pedagogy to remove “weak” traits and train “strength” (which is a way of rationalizing torture and projective identification) were often sadistic and included

  • making the toddler wait for food, or starving while seeing others eat
  • corporal punishment
  • social isolation
  • withdrawal of primary attachment figure
  • inflicting fear by telling scaring stories
  • threats and assaults
  • humiliation and degradation generally accepted as “good” methods
  • cheating and lying
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Posted in #Alienators will be alienated, #child alienation, #Complex Trauma, #Narcopath, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Does shared parenting by separated parents affect the adjustment of young children?

The changing family roles and evidence that most infants form attachment relationships with both of their parents have sparked a debate about parenting arrangements when the parents of infants and toddlers separate. Misunderstanding of attachment theory and the available empirical evidence has obscured rather than clarified evidence-based decision-making. In this report, I closely examine the five studies most frequently referenced in this context and show what they do and do not tell us about the ways in which children’s adjustment can be promoted when their parents separate. Consistent with attachment theory, the evidence suggests that children benefit when parenting plans allow them to maintain meaningful and positive relationships with both of their parents

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Posted in #Complex Trauma, #Pathogenic Parenting, A Narcissistic Parent, a pathological liar, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

High-Conflict Divorce: Antecedents and Consequences | Behavioral Health

High-conflict divorce can deeply affect the lives of parents and children. When parents separate, children can suffer emotionally, resulting in adverse developmental outcomes such as low self-worth and attention deficits. In cases of high-conflict divorce involving domestic violence or child abuse, heightened levels of childhood depression and anxiety can also result. These affective issues can contribute to significant distress for involved child throughout the lifespan. Given the adverse nature of high-conflict divorces, mental health professionals must provide appropriate interventions to ensure the welfare of children are a top priority.

Continue reading “High-Conflict Divorce: Antecedents and Consequences | Behavioral Health”

Posted in #child alienation, #Complex Trauma, A closer look at Parental Alienation, Parental Alienation, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Adult report of childhood exposure to parental alienation at different developmental time periods

The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between exposure to Parental Alienation (PA) at different developmental time periods and psychological maltreatment. Three hundred and sixty‐one adults in Chieti, Italy completed an anonymous and confidential paper and pencil survey regarding their childhood exposure to twenty PA behaviours across three developmental time periods as well as a measure of psychological maltreatment by each parent. Results revealed that exposure to PA at each time period was significantly associated with psychological maltreatment. Moreover, the number of time periods of exposure to PA (from 0 to 3) was associated with psychological maltreatment. This was true for PA by mothers and PA by fathers. Implications for policy and practice are discussed.

Practitioner points

  • Mental health professionals can use the results of this study to guide their intervention efforts
  • Co‐parenting educators can incorporate these results into their routine efforts to help parents be aware of PA and its effects
  • Targeted parents can use these findings to make the case for timely legal and mental health interventions

Posted in #child alienation, #Complex Trauma, #Pathogenic Parenting, A HAPPY WAY TO DEAL WITH PARENTAL ALIENATION, A lesson of life after her parents been divorced, A Solution To End ‘Parental Alienation’?, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Parental Alienation Syndrome: A Family Therapy

The text serves as an excellent introduction to the reader who is unfamiliar with the PAS construct. Supporters of PAS will be emboldened by the gravitas of family experiences and their emotional impact on the reader, whereas critics of PAS are unlikely to be swayed by Gottlieb’s lines of argument. Regardless of one’s beliefs about PAS, however, Gottlieb makes a compelling argument for the “‘condition’ of a child being lost to 1 parent due to malicious programming by the other parent.” Professionals who have ever worked with children and families undergoing custody disputes will find this a thought-provoking text that invites self-contemplation and further exploration of the PAS concept.

Continue reading “Parental Alienation Syndrome: A Family Therapy”

Posted in #Complex Trauma, Long-Term Health, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Relational Treatment of Complex Trauma, The Complex Trauma Questionnaire, The Medea Complex: The myth.

Long-Term Health Consequences

Traumatic experiences in childhood have been linked to increased medical conditions throughout the individuals’ lives. The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study is a longitudinal study that explores the long-lasting impact of childhood trauma into adulthood. The ACE Study includes over 17,000 participants ranging in age from 19 to 90. Researchers gathered medical histories over time while also collecting data on the subjects’ childhood exposure to abuse, violence, and impaired caregivers.  Results indicated that nearly 64% of participants experienced at least one exposure, and of those, 69% reported two or more incidents of childhood trauma.       Results demonstrated the connection between childhood trauma exposure, high-risk behaviors (e.g., smoking, unprotected sex), chronic illness such as heart disease and cancer, and early death.

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Posted in #Complex Trauma, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Relational Treatment of Complex Trauma, The Complex Trauma Questionnaire

Effects of Complex Trauma

Physical Health: Body and Brain

From infancy through adolescence, the body’s biology develops. Normal biological function is partly determined by environment. When a child grows up afraid or under constant or extreme stress, the immune system and body’s stress response systems may not develop normally. Later on, when the child or adult is exposed to even ordinary levels of stress, these systems may automatically respond as if the individual is under extreme stress. For example, an individual may experience significant physiological reactivity such as rapid breathing or heart pounding, or  may “shut down” entirely when presented with stressful situations.  These responses, while adaptive when faced with a significant threat, are out of proportion in the context of normal stress and are often perceived by others as “overreacting” or as unresponsive or detached.    Continue reading “Effects of Complex Trauma”

Posted in #Complex Trauma, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Relational Treatment of Complex Trauma, The Complex Trauma Questionnaire

Complex trauma can affect children

The importance of a child’s close relationship with a caregiver cannot be overestimated. Through relationships with important attachment figures, children learn to trust others, regulate their emotions, and interact with the world; they develop a sense of the world as safe or unsafe, and come to understand their own value as individuals. When those relationships are unstable or unpredictable, children learn that they cannot rely on others to help them. When primary caregivers exploit and abuse a child, the child learns that he or she is bad and the world is a terrible place.

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The majority of abused or neglected children have difficulty developing a strong healthy attachment to a caregiver. Children who do not have healthy attachments have been shown to be more vulnerable to stress. They have trouble controlling and expressing emotions, and may react violently or inappropriately to situations. Our ability to develop healthy, supportive relationships with friends and significant others depends on our having first developed those kinds of relationships in our families. A child with a complex trauma history may have problems in romantic relationships, in friendships, and with authority figures, such as teachers or police officers. Continue reading “Complex trauma can affect children”