Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

  1. Master’s degree or above in a mental health discipline;
  2. Permanent professional license in home state, including having passed the state licensing exam in your mental health discipline;
  3. Completion of TF-CBTWeb;
  4. Participation in a live TF-CBT training (two days) conducted by a treatment developer or an approved national trainer (graduate of our TF-CBT Train-the-Trainer Program); or
    Live training in the context of an approved national, regional, or state TF-CBT Learning Collaborative of at least six months duration in which one of the treatment developers or a graduate of our TF-CBT Train-the-Trainer (TTT) Program has been a lead faculty member;
  5. Participation in follow-up consultation or supervision on a twice a month basis for at least six months or a once a month basis for at least twelve months. The candidate must participate in at least nine out of the twelve consultation or supervisory sessions. This consultation must be provided by one of the treatment developers or a graduate from our TTT program. Supervision may be provided by one of the treatment developers, a graduate of our TTT program, or a graduate of our TF-CBT Train-the-Supervisor (TTS) Program (In the latter instance, the supervisor must be employed at the same organization as the certification candidate);
    or
    Active participation in at least nine of the required cluster/consultation calls in the context of an approved TF-CBT Learning Collaborative;
  6. Completion of three separate TF-CBT treatment cases with three children or adolescents with at least two of the cases including the active participation of caretakers or another designated third party (e.g., direct care staff member in a residential treatment facility)
  7. Use of at least one standardized instrument to assess TF-CBT treatment progress with each of the above cases;
  8. Taking and passing TF-CBT Therapist Certification Program Knowledge-Based Test.

https://www.tfcbt.org/tf-cbt-certification-criteria/

What to Look for in a Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapist

Look for a licensed mental health professional with specialized training and experience in cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy as well as further training and supervised experience in trauma-focused therapy. In addition to these credentials, it is important to find a therapist with whom you and your child feel comfortable working.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapy-types/trauma-focused-cognitive-behavior-therapy

Somatic Therapy

Somatic therapy is a form of body-centered therapy that looks at the connection of mind and body and uses both psychotherapy and physical therapies for holistic healing. In addition to talk therapy, somatic therapy practitioners use mind-body exercises and other physical techniques to help release the pent-up tension that is negatively affecting your physical and emotional wellbeing.

When It’s Used

Somatic therapy can help people who suffer from stressanxietydepressiongriefaddiction, problems with relationships, and sexual function, as well as issues related to trauma and abuse. Those for whom traditional remedies have not been helpful for chronic physical pain, digestive disorders and other medical issues may also benefit from somatic therapy. Somatic therapy techniques can be used in both individual and group therapy settings.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapy-types/somatic-therapy

The CBTs in Later Life

Cognitive behavioral therapies (CBTs) and interventions have strong evidence of being effective for behavioral health conditions in diverse middle-aged and older adults. Not all aging individuals require adaptations of standard CBTs, yet some features of later life merit special attention. Culturally responsive CBTs include affirmation of personal strengths, along with consideration of modifications to improve clinical outcomes in later life. Stepped care approaches that utilize task shifting, along with innovative models of service delivery by video, telephone and the internet, can provide flexible methods to expand reach and enhance quality of life for aging populations across the globe.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128186978001060

NLP and CBT Practitioner

Cognitive Restructuring

Can a Narcissist Change? YES

There are several approaches to dealing with narcissism, but therapy typically involves these essential steps:

  • identifying existing defense mechanisms
  • exploring reasons behind these coping methods
  • learning and practicing new patterns of behavior
  • exploring how behaviors affect others
  • examining connections between their internal voice and their treatment of others

The key to lasting progress often lies in:

  • helping someone see how positive change can benefit them
  • helping them explore causes of narcissistic defenses without criticism or judgment
  • offering validation
  • encouraging self-forgiveness and self-compassion to manage shame and vulnerability

https://www.healthline.com/health/can-a-narcissist-change

Can a Narcissist Change? What to Expect

It’s not uncommon for people with narcissistic tendencies to experience other mental health concerns, including depression, anxiety, anorexia nervosa, and substance misuse. These other issues, rather than narcissistic traits, often encourage people to seek therapy

https://www.healthline.com/health/can-a-narcissist-change

Individual and Marital Therapy with Narcissists | Psychology Today

Although narcissism is difficult to treat, progress can be made over time. Even weekly sessions over a shorter term can yield benefits. Patients’ functioning and adaptation to reality can improve through gaining some control over their defenses and by working through past trauma (Masterson, 2004). They can learn to manage their anger, rage, and impulsivity. Although narcissists may feign empathy in order to get close or win others’ approval, subclinical narcissists (without full-blown NPD) have been taught empathy by using their imagination to put themselves in another’s shoes (Hepper, Hart, & Sedikides, 2014). Narcissists who are philanthropists or volunteers in the community for the public approbation to boost their self-esteem can learn to empathize and be less self-centered by helping others without personal gain.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/toxic-relationships/201905/individual-and-marital-therapy-narcissists

Is Couples’ Therapy Useful When One Partner Is a Narcissist? | Psychology Today

How Does All of This Affect Couple’s Therapy?

Effective couples’ therapy requires each member of the couple to be willing to reflect on his or her beliefs, behaviors, and impact on the other person. It is necessary for people in couples’ therapy to be able to admit where their behavior or their expectations for the relationship are unreasonable. Narcissists cannot admit their flaws without in their own mind shifting from feeling special to worthless. This makes it highly unlikely that they will actually be able to utilize couples’ therapy to try to improve their approach to the relationship.

One of the following four scenarios usually occurs:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/understanding-narcissism/201904/is-couples-therapy-useful-when-one-partner-is-narcissist