Posted in Alienated children, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection, Children's Rights, Childrens Act 1989, Parental Alienation PA

What do we know about childhood anxiety and what can parents do about it?

Feeling anxious and worried is a normal experience for children, but how do we know when it’s becoming a serious problem and what can we do about it? Claudia Hammond discusses these issues and more with expert Professor Cathy Creswell from the University of Reading, and Beckie, whose whole family was affected by her son’s anxiety.

https://www.annafreud.org/parents-and-carers/child-in-mind/

Posted in Alienated children, Child abuse, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection, Children's Rights, Childrens Act 1989

Jean Piaget’s Theory and Stages of Cognitive Development

Piaget (1936) was the first psychologist to make a systematic study of cognitive development. His contributions include a stage theory of child cognitive development, detailed observational studies of cognition in children, and a series of simple but ingenious tests to reveal different cognitive abilities.

What Piaget wanted to do was not to measure how well children could count, spell or solve problems as a way of grading their I.Q. What he was more interested in was the way in which fundamental concepts like the very idea of number, time, quantity, causalityjustice and so on emerged.

Before Piaget’s work, the common assumption in psychology was that children are merely less competent thinkers than adults. Piaget showed that young children think in strikingly different ways compared to adults.

According to Piaget, children are born with a very basic mental structure (genetically inherited and evolved) on which all subsequent learning and knowledge are based.

Jean Piaget’s Theory and Stages of Cognitive Development https://www.simplypsychology.org/piaget.html

Posted in Alienated children, Children's Rights, Childrens Act 1989

The Alienated Child

Most children are born with the capacities to think for themselves, to process both negative and positive experience, and thereby restructure things so that each generation can improve over the last. These capacities can be developed. Given opportunities to perceive both healthy and problematic aspects of different people and to respond to those perceptions within the context of an empathic relationship, most children will develop a self that is not only different, but has a good chance of being more functionally effective than either parent has been. Of course, the children will not be perfect, either.

They do not need to carry the burden of trying to be.

No human being is perfect.

The child who is solely or primarily dependent on one parent is in jeopardy. The child who has access to multiple relationships with people who can help in different ways and learns to process a variety of experiences is our hope for the future.

As a Parental Alienation Recovery specialist, I am able to guide you through your healing journey. Connect with me via phone or email today to begin the process of recovery.

Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, Child Custody Rights, Child Protection, Children's Rights, Childrens Act 1989, Parental Alienation PA

Child Contact Page

If you are an alienated child (perhaps an adult now), please register your interest if you would like to re-establish your relationship with one of your parents. Simply email us on info@ukap.one

Likewise, if you are a parent looking for an alienated child, register your interest by mailing us and we will let you know if your child makes contact with us. Sometimes a child will prefer and need the contact to be indirect and to be handled sensitively.

Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, Child abuse, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection, Children's Rights, Childrens Act 1989, Parental Alienation PA

Physically present, but otherwise absent

When you were growing up, was your parent there, but not really there? “Another indicator of emotional abuse is if you had a parent who was physically present, but otherwise absent — working on the computer, phone, or locked in a home office, talking to everyone but you, or lost in a drug- or alcohol-induced haze,” Dr. Tessina says. “Now, as an adult, you may not know how to interact with people in a healthy way, or you may feel disconnected and lost. Plus, you could be disconnected from yourself, having no sense of being with yourself.”

Continue reading “Physically present, but otherwise absent”

Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, Child Custody Rights, Child Protection, Children's Rights, Childrens Act 1989, Parental Alienation PA

UN Convention on the rights of the child

64

Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, Child abuse, Child Custody Rights, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection, Children's Rights, Childrens Act 1989

Parental Alienation as a Form of Emotional Child Abuse: Current State of Knowledge and Future Directions for Research

This article examines the current state of research on parental alienation, which
reveals that alienation is far more common and debilitating for children and parents than was previously believed. In extreme cases, one can make the argument that parental alienation is a serious form of emotional child abuse. Careful scrutiny of key elements of parental alienation in the research literature consistently identifies two core elements of child abuse: parental alienation as a significant form of harm to children that is attributable to human action. As a form of individual child abuse, parental alienation calls for a child protection response. As a form of collective abuse, parental alienation warrants fundamental reform of the family law system in the
direction of shared parenting as the foundation of family law. There is an emerging scientific consensus on prevalence, effects, and professional recognition of parental alienation as a form of child abuse. In response, the authors discuss the need for research on effectiveness of parental alienation interventions, particularly in more extreme cases. This paper argues for more quantitative and qualitative research focused on four pillars of intervention at micro and macro levels, with specific recommendations for further study of child protection responses, reunification programs, and other therapeutic approaches. Continue reading “Parental Alienation as a Form of Emotional Child Abuse: Current State of Knowledge and Future Directions for Research”

Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, Child abuse, Child Custody Rights, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection, Children's Rights, Childrens Act 1989

Parental Alienation (Syndrome)-A serious form of psychological child abuse

Induced parental alienation is a specific form of psychological child abuse, which is listed in DSM-5, the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), under diagnostic code V 995.51 “child psychological
abuse”. Untreated induced parental alienation can lead to long-term traumatic psychological and physical effects in the children concerned. This fact is still not given sufficient attention in family court cases. The article gives a condensed overview of parental alienation, summarising its definition, the symptoms and the various levels of severity. It also describes some major alienation techniques and possible psychosomatic and psychiatric effects of induced parental alienation. Finally,
attention is drawn to programmes of prevention and intervention now used and evaluated in some countries. The article concludes with two real-life examples from psychiatric practice, and a comprehensive list of international references. Continue reading “Parental Alienation (Syndrome)-A serious form of psychological child abuse”

Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, Child abuse, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection, Children's Rights, Childrens Act 1989

An understudied form of child abuse and ‘intimate terrorism’: Parental alienation

Researchers are urging psychological, legal and child custodial disciplines to recognize parental alienation as family violence

According to Colorado State University social psychologist Jennifer Harman, about 22 million American parents have been the victims of behaviors that lead to something called parental alienation. Having researched the phenomenon for several years, Harman is urging psychological, legal and child custodial disciplines to recognize parental alienation as a form of both child abuse and intimate partner violence. Harman has authored a review article in Psychological Bulletin defining the behaviors associated with parental alienation and advocating for more research into its prevalence and outcomes. Continue reading “An understudied form of child abuse and ‘intimate terrorism’: Parental alienation”