Posted in Alienated children, Child abuse, Child Custody Rights, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection

Neuroscience Research

The brain learns through trusting relationships If we are with people we know and trust then our minds are more open to new experiences. We are open to trying something new or to changing our beliefs about the world and other people.
The capacity of the brain to learn in everyday life depends on relationships with trusted others.

A lack of trust can make us feel isolated and disengaged – even if we are with others – and make us less able to learn. For children who have experienced abuse and neglect, a lack of trust may be one factor that explains their greater difficulty in learning. A child who does not trust those around them needs to be vigilant and wary. They may not
be able to focus their attention on what excites and engages them in the classroom or at home

https://uktraumacouncil.org/resources/childhood-trauma-and-the-brain?

Posted in Alienated children, Child abuse, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection, Parental Alienation PA

Childhood Trauma and the Brain: How Mental Health Problems Develop

We know that mental health problems after abuse and neglect are not inevitable. Many children grow up to be healthy and successful adults. In this video, Linking Childhood Trauma to Mental Health, Professor Eamon McCrory explains what scientists have learned about how mental health problems develop over time in an accessible way for professionals and carers working with children.

Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, Child abuse, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection

The Adolescent Brain

In the final edition of Child in Mind, Claudia Hammond talks about the often misunderstood changes that happen during adolescence with young person Yaamin and Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at UCL Sarah-Jane Blakemore

https://www.annafreud.org/parents-and-carers/child-in-mind/

Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, Child abuse, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection

What is trauma and how does it affect the brain?

What is trauma, what does it look like, and how does it affect the brain? These questions are discussed in this month’s Child in Mind podcast. Presenter Claudia Hammond is joined by David Trickey, Consultant Clinical Child Psychologist in the Trauma and Maltreatment Service at the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families.

https://www.annafreud.org/parents-and-carers/child-in-mind/

Posted in Alienated children, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection, Children's Rights, Childrens Act 1989, Parental Alienation PA

What do we know about childhood anxiety and what can parents do about it?

Feeling anxious and worried is a normal experience for children, but how do we know when it’s becoming a serious problem and what can we do about it? Claudia Hammond discusses these issues and more with expert Professor Cathy Creswell from the University of Reading, and Beckie, whose whole family was affected by her son’s anxiety.

https://www.annafreud.org/parents-and-carers/child-in-mind/

Posted in Alienated children, Child abuse, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection, Parental Alienation PA

Children and Young People’s Mental Health:Early intervention, ongoing support and flexible evidence-based care

Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, Child abuse, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection

Psychological “wounds”

If young children dont get their developmental needs met, they automatically survive by forming a split personality. This causes several interrelated psychological “wounds”

Posted in Alienated children, Child abuse, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection, Children's Rights, Childrens Act 1989

Jean Piaget’s Theory and Stages of Cognitive Development

Piaget (1936) was the first psychologist to make a systematic study of cognitive development. His contributions include a stage theory of child cognitive development, detailed observational studies of cognition in children, and a series of simple but ingenious tests to reveal different cognitive abilities.

What Piaget wanted to do was not to measure how well children could count, spell or solve problems as a way of grading their I.Q. What he was more interested in was the way in which fundamental concepts like the very idea of number, time, quantity, causalityjustice and so on emerged.

Before Piaget’s work, the common assumption in psychology was that children are merely less competent thinkers than adults. Piaget showed that young children think in strikingly different ways compared to adults.

According to Piaget, children are born with a very basic mental structure (genetically inherited and evolved) on which all subsequent learning and knowledge are based.

Jean Piaget’s Theory and Stages of Cognitive Development https://www.simplypsychology.org/piaget.html

Posted in Alienated children, Child abuse, Child Custody Rights, Child Maltreatment, Parental Alienation PA

What are the long-term effects of parental alienation on the child who has been alienated?

The results are devastating for the alienated child and can last a lifetime. Not only does the child miss out on a lifetime of having an enjoyable and fulfilling relationship with the parent they have been conditioned to reject, they also develop some serious pathological behaviors and attitudes that carry in to their adult lives.

Following are descriptions of some of these disturbing effects:

  • Splitting: This is the psychological phenomenon of seeing people as either “all bad” or “all good,” or “black or white.” Everything is polarized and the person has an inability to see shades of gray. Think of the borderline personality disordered person who has to split in order to cope with relationships and life in general. This is not a disorder you want your child to possess and leads to endless problems.
  • Difficulties forming and maintaining relationships: Alienated children struggle with developing healthy relationships because they have been conditioned to “get rid of people” whenever they experience a perceived threat. Since most people are flawed, the alienated child would need the skill of knowing how to accept flaws in others in order to maintain the relationship. Skills such as flexibility, acceptance, forgiveness, do not exist when you reject people outright for minor infractions, as alienated children have been trained to do.Whenever someone causes a perceived threat to this person, he/she is triggered to remember, “I know how to handle this,” and they proceed to reject the other person easily. Their mind tells them, “You just hurt my feelings. I’m going to close you out and now you’re done.”
  • https://pro.psychcentral.com/recovery-expert/2020/08/long-term-results-of-parental-alienation-to-the-alienated-child/
Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, Child abuse, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection, Parental Alienation PA

Recognizing a Severely Alienated Child

  • They have a relentless hatred for/towards the targeted parent.
  • They parrot the Obsessed Alienator.
  • The child does not want to visit or spend any time with the targeted parent.
  • Many of the child’s beliefs are enmeshed with the alienator.
  • The beliefs are delusional and frequently irrational.
  • They are not intimidated by the court.
  • Frequently, their reasons are not based on personal experiences with the targeted parent but reflect what they are told by the Obsessed Alienator. They have difficulty making any distinction between the two.
  • The child has no ambivalence in his or her feelings; it’s all hatred with no ability to see the good.
  • They have no capacity to feel guilty about how they behave towards the targeted parent or forgive any past indiscretions.
  • They share the Obsessed Alienators cause. Together, they are in lockstep to denigrate the hated parent.
  • The children’s obsessional hatred extends to the targeted parent’s extended family without any guilt or remorse.
  • They can appear like normal healthy children until asked about the targeted parent that triggers their hatred.

 Information Provided by: Douglas Darnell, Ph.D.