Posted in Alienated children, Child abuse, Child Custody Rights, Child Maltreatment, Parental Alienation PA

What are the long-term effects of parental alienation on the child who has been alienated?

The results are devastating for the alienated child and can last a lifetime. Not only does the child miss out on a lifetime of having an enjoyable and fulfilling relationship with the parent they have been conditioned to reject, they also develop some serious pathological behaviors and attitudes that carry in to their adult lives.

Following are descriptions of some of these disturbing effects:

  • Splitting: This is the psychological phenomenon of seeing people as either “all bad” or “all good,” or “black or white.” Everything is polarized and the person has an inability to see shades of gray. Think of the borderline personality disordered person who has to split in order to cope with relationships and life in general. This is not a disorder you want your child to possess and leads to endless problems.
  • Difficulties forming and maintaining relationships: Alienated children struggle with developing healthy relationships because they have been conditioned to “get rid of people” whenever they experience a perceived threat. Since most people are flawed, the alienated child would need the skill of knowing how to accept flaws in others in order to maintain the relationship. Skills such as flexibility, acceptance, forgiveness, do not exist when you reject people outright for minor infractions, as alienated children have been trained to do.Whenever someone causes a perceived threat to this person, he/she is triggered to remember, “I know how to handle this,” and they proceed to reject the other person easily. Their mind tells them, “You just hurt my feelings. I’m going to close you out and now you’re done.”
  • https://pro.psychcentral.com/recovery-expert/2020/08/long-term-results-of-parental-alienation-to-the-alienated-child/
Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, Child Custody Rights, Child Protection, Children's Rights, Childrens Act 1989, Parental Alienation PA

Child Contact Page

If you are an alienated child (perhaps an adult now), please register your interest if you would like to re-establish your relationship with one of your parents. Simply email us on info@ukap.one

Likewise, if you are a parent looking for an alienated child, register your interest by mailing us and we will let you know if your child makes contact with us. Sometimes a child will prefer and need the contact to be indirect and to be handled sensitively.

Posted in Alienated children, Child abuse, Child Custody Rights, Child Maltreatment, Children's Rights

Here Are Some Potential Consequences of Teaching a Child to Hate:

Here Are Some Potential Consequences of Teaching a Child to Hate:

  • Negative or judgmental personality
  • Poor adjustment
  • Difficulty trusting others
  • Difficulty initiating and maintaining relationships
  • Poor relationship quality
  • Aggressive/defiant behavior
  • Depression
  • Low self-esteem
  • Guilt or confusion surrounding negative feelings about the other parent
  • Self-hatred

Every child has the right to have a loving and healthy relationship with both his or her parents. Divorced or otherwise separated parents are expected to encourage and nurture the relationship between the child and the other parent. Alienating parents are typically so consumed by their own feelings that they feel to recognize they are alienating the child in addition to their former partner. Hate, animosity, or resentment are not emotions that comes naturally to children; it has to be taught. A parent that teaches and encourages a child to hate the other parent and his or her new spouse or partner runs the risk of damaging the child both emotionally and psychologically. Unfortunately, with ongoing encouragement and exposure to hate and animosity the negative effects on a child can be lengthy and significant.

THEY MAY TURN AROUND AND HATE YOU ONE DAY

https://blogs.psychcentral.com/relationship-corner/2016/08/teaching-a-child-to-hate-10-consequences-of-hate/

Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, Child Custody Rights, Parental Alienation PA

She Said Her Husband Hit Her. She Lost Custody of Their Kids

How reporting domestic violence works against women in family court.

Coronado was angry. A slender Mexican-American woman with long dark hair and a whip-quick mind, she’d scraped her way up from a New Mexico trailer park to serve in the Peace Corps and graduate from the University of Texas Law School. She married Ed Cunningham, a former football star turned lawyer and businessman, and had three boys and a girl. And she’d stayed home to raise them, for long stretches on her own, through a tumultuous 15-year-marriage that broke down when she discovered her husband had bought a second house across town where he was having an affair with another woman. Continue reading “She Said Her Husband Hit Her. She Lost Custody of Their Kids”

Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, Child Custody Rights, Parental Alienation PA

Children’s Legal Rights Journal

In jurisdictions throughout the United States, courts have severed maternal contact with chidren based on expert testimony diagnosing mothers with a novel psychological syndrome called Parental Alienation Syndrome (“PAS”) that
purportedly results in the alienation of children
from their fathers

Hoult-PASarticlechildrenslawjournal.pdf.

Posted in Child abuse, Child Custody Rights, Child Maltreatment, Child Protection

Childhood Psychological Abuse as Harmful as Sexual or Physical Abuse

Researchers used the National Child Traumatic Stress Network Core Data Set to analyze data from 5,616 youths with lifetime histories of one or more of three types of abuse: psychological maltreatment (emotional abuse or emotional neglect), physical abuse and sexual abuse. The majority (62 percent) had a history of psychological maltreatment, and nearly a quarter (24 percent) of all the cases were exclusively psychological maltreatment, which the study defined as caregiver-inflicted bullying, terrorizing, coercive control, severe insults, debasement, threats, overwhelming demands, shunning and/or isolation.

Children who had been psychologically abused suffered from anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, symptoms of post-traumatic stress and suicidality at the same rate and, in some cases, at a greater rate than children who were physically or sexually abused. Among the three types of abuse, psychological maltreatment was most strongly associated with depression, general anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, attachment problems and substance abuse. Psychological maltreatment that occurred alongside physical or sexual abuse was associated with significantly more severe and far-ranging negative outcomes than when children were sexually and physically abused and not psychologically abused, the study found. Moreover, sexual and physical abuse had to occur at the same time to have the same effect as psychological abuse alone on behavioral issues at school, attachment problems and self-injurious behaviors, the research found.

“Child protective service case workers may have a harder time recognizing and substantiating emotional neglect and abuse because there are no physical wounds,” said Spinazzola. “Also, psychological abuse isn’t considered a serious social taboo like physical and sexual child abuse. We need public awareness initiatives to help people understand just how harmful psychological maltreatment is for children and adolescents.” Continue reading “Childhood Psychological Abuse as Harmful as Sexual or Physical Abuse”

Posted in Alienated children, Alienation, Child Custody Rights, Child Protection, Children's Rights, Childrens Act 1989, Parental Alienation PA

UN Convention on the rights of the child

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