Posted in 4 Forms of Borderline Personality Disorder, BORDERLINE (EMOTIONALLY UNSTABLE) PERSONALITY DISORDER, Borderline Personality Disorder, Parental Alienation PA, What causes borderline personality disorder?, What is Borderline Personality Disorder?

The Impact of Being Raised by a BPD Parent

The Challenge: A borderline personality disordered (BPD) individual has a very fragile and unpredictable personality. They may be highly educated and have very successful careers. However, they struggle with interpersonal relationships because they are too fragile to be effective. They are very much like emotional children locked in an adult body, expected to function in adult relationships. When things are going their way, they can be delightful and charming. As soon as they do not get their way, or someone crosses them, they will quickly resort to destructive means to stabilize their fragile sense of self.

Coping Mechanisms: The BPD’s greatest fear is to be abandoned and they will do just about anything to avoid the crushing blow of perceived rejection. They must feel they are loved at all times. They will create dependency in their child and will have difficulty seeing their child as separate. Sadly they “split” which means they view others, including their children, as either all good or all bad.

They do not allow themselves to acknowledge anything in the “gray” area of life where most of reality exists. For example, if their child loves the other parent, then the BPD parent will over-react and believe they are being rejected by their child. They teach their child that if they want to feel safe then they have to adore them. They make it known in every possible way that “You are for me or you are against me.” If there is more than one child, the BPD parent may even idealize one child and reject the other.

The Impact of Being Raised by a Borderline Personality Disordered Parent

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Posted in 4 Forms of Borderline Personality Disorder, BORDERLINE (EMOTIONALLY UNSTABLE) PERSONALITY DISORDER, Borderline Personality Disorder, Fast facts on borderline personality disorder, Narcissistic and borderline personalities exist, Parental Alienation PA, Surviving the Borderline Father:

Children of parents with Borderline Personality Disorder

Children of mothers with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) are a disadvantaged group of children that are at risk for future psychopathology.  Crandell et al. (1997) demonstrated that, for these children, attachment status is not completely stable.

Some children are able to resolve early traumatic experiences and are able to obtain an ‘earned secure’ attachment status in adulthood. Adults with an earned secure status function comparably to adults who had secure attachment status as children (Crandell et al, 1997). These findings hold great promises for the prognosis of children of mothers with BPD. With adequate attention and intervention, there is hope that children of mothers with BPD will overcome the risks associated with this maternal psychopathology.

Have Your Parents Put You at Risk for Psychopathology

Posted in 10 Parental Alienation Fallacies:, 3 Hidden Weapons of Parental Alienation, 3 keys that make parental alienation so powerfu, 4 Forms of Borderline Personality Disorder, A closer look at Parental Alienation, A GUIDE TO THE PARENTAL ALIENATION SYNDROME, Parental Alienation, Parental Alienation PA

Risks to Professionals Who Work With Troubled and Alienated Parent-Child Relationships

Working with children who have irrationally rejected a parent is an emerging area of practice with unique risks. The dynamics that drive false allegations about a parent also drive accusations against professionals who participate in a process to reunify the children with that parent. This article discusses protective measures to reduce risks of false accusations, character assassination, harassment, and violence. Recommendations are offered for organizations charged with investigating complaints. Agencies that do an inadequate job of handling such complaints may harm the public by driving innovators from the field and reducing the availability of programs that have helped many families.

Risks to Professionals Who Work With Troubled and Alienated Parent-Child Relationships

Posted in 4 Forms of Borderline Personality Disorder

4 Forms of Borderline Personality Disorder

Does This Fit You or Someone You Love?

Do sudden; out of proportion emotions seem to run your life, or that of the ones you love? Do you feel disdain and anger toward someone whom you love and respect, leaving you confused as to how you can feel that way? Does reading negative words trigger fits of rage? Read on, you may have Borderline Personality Disorder. There is hope though, through therapies and support, a person with Borderline Personality Disorder can live a normal life.

Emotions and Reactions

Do you or someone in your life seem out of control? One minute they are sweet and kind, and then as if something overcame them, they are angry and saying things they would not say when in the kind mode. Perhaps this person seems like they have two different personalities but yet, they are the same person. Perhaps this person is you. You cannot understand why you can read a negative word and get so angry, unrealistically so. Or why you get so angry and out of sorts over every day negative situations. You may think you have an anger problem, but yet you feel so empty and lost, how could you have an anger problem and feel so lost? Maybe you get angry and then do not care about it, you try to go on with life while those that you just fought with are reeling with pain and shock at your reaction. You may not know why you are like this but feel something needs to change. You may learn you have Borderline Personality Disorder.

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a mental disorder that is relatively new in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision or DSM-IV-TR. The diagnosis of BPD involves history of symptoms and exclusion of other mental and physical health disorders.

http://cynthianne.hubpages.com/hub/Four-Primary-Forms-of-Borderline-Personality-Disorder

Posted in Borderline Personality Disorder

Borderline Personality Disorder

Borderline Personality Disorder

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a condition characterized by difficulties in regulating emotion. This difficulty leads to severe, unstable mood swings, impulsivity and instability, poor self-image and stormy personal relationships. People may make repeated attempts to avoid real or imagined situations of abandonment. The combined result of living with BPD can manifest into destructive behavior, such as self-harm (cutting) or suicide attempts.

It’s estimated that 1.6% of the adult U.S. population has BPD but it may be as high as 5.9%. Nearly 75% of people diagnosed with BPD are women, but recent research suggests that men may be almost as frequently affected by BPD. In the past, men with BPD were often misdiagnosed with PTSD or depression.

Symptoms

People with BPD experience wide mood swings and can display a great sense of instability and insecurity. Signs and symptoms may include:

  • Frantic efforts to avoid being abandoned by friends and family.
  • Unstable personal relationships that alternate between idealization—“I’m so in love!”—and devaluation—“I hate her.” This is also sometimes known as “splitting.”
  • Distorted and unstable self-image, which affects moods, values, opinions, goals and relationships.
  • Impulsive behaviors that can have dangerous outcomes, such as excessive spending, unsafe sex, substance abuse or reckless driving.
  • Suicidal and self-harming behavior.
  • Periods of intense depressed mood, irritability or anxiety lasting a few hours to a few days.
  • Chronic feelings of boredom or emptiness.
  • Inappropriate, intense or uncontrollable anger—often followed by shame and guilt.
  • Dissociative feelings—disconnecting from your thoughts or sense of identity, or “out of body” type of feelings—and stress-related paranoid thoughts. Severe cases of stress can also lead to brief psychotic episodes.

Borderline personality disorder is ultimately characterized by the emotional turmoil it causes. People who have it feel emotions intensely and for long periods of time, and it is harder for them to return to a stable baseline after an emotionally intense event. Suicide threats and attempts are very common for people with BPD. Self-harming acts, such as cutting and burning, are also common.

Causes

The causes of borderline personality disorder are not fully understood, but scientists agree that it is the result of a combination of factors:

  • Genetics. While no specific gene has been shown to directly cause BPD, studies in twins suggest this illness has strong hereditary links. BPD is about five times more common among people who have a first-degree relative with the disorder.
  • Environmental factors. People who experience traumatic life events, such as physical or sexual abuse during childhood or neglect and separation from parents, are at increased risk of developing BPD.
  • Brain function. The way the brain works is often different in people with BPD, suggesting that there is a neurological basis for some of the symptoms. Specifically, the portions of the brain that control emotions and decision-making/judgment may not communicate well with one another.

Diagnosis

There is no single medical test to diagnose BPD, and a diagnosis is not based on one sign or symptom. BPD is diagnosed by a mental health professional following a comprehensive psychiatric interview that may include talking with previous clinicians, medical evaluations and, when appropriate, interviews with friends and family. To be diagnosed with BPD, a person must have at least 5 of the 9 BPD symptoms listed above.

Treatment

A typical, well-rounded treatment plan includes psychotherapy, medications and group, peer and family support. The overarching goal is for someone with BPD to increasingly self-direct her treatment plan as a person learns what works as well as what doesn’t.

  • Psychotherapy, such as dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic psychotherapy, is the first line of choice for BPD.
  • Medications are often instrumental to a treatment plan, but there is no one medication specifically made to treat the core symptoms of emptiness, abandonment and identity disturbance. Rather, several medications can be used off-label to treat the remaining symptoms. For example, mood stabilizers and antidepressants help with mood swings and dysphoria. Antipsychotic medication may help control symptoms of rage and disorganized thinking.
  • Short-term hospitalization may be necessary during times of extreme stress, and/or impulsive or suicidal behavior to ensure safety.

Related Conditions

BPD can be difficult to diagnose and treat—and successful treatment includes addressing any other disorders somebody might have. A person with BPD may have additional conditions like:

  • Anxiety disorders, such as PTSD.
  • Bipolar disorder.
  • Depression.
  • Eating disorders, notably bulimia nervosa.
  • Other personality disorders.
  • Substance use disorders.

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– See more at: https://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Borderline-Personality-Disorder#sthash.nfrK9Ohs.dpuf