Attachment Category

What are the 4 types of attachment?

The four child/adult attachment styles are: Secure – autonomous; Avoidant – dismissing; Anxious – preoccupied; and. Disorganized – unresolved. Adults with these attachment styles differ in a number of significant ways: how they perceive and deal with closeness and emotional intimacy. ability to communicate their emotions and needs, and listen to and understand the emotions […]

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“Attachment trauma and the effects of neglect and abuse on the brain“.

Dr. Allan Schore discusses “Attachment trauma and the effects of neglect and abuse on the brain“. The development of severe Psychopathologies occurs during right Brain development, during very early childhood. Attachment Trauma and Abandonment Trauma are all stored in the right hemisphere of the Brain, even before the left hemisphere starts to develop. That is why Brain Scans of Narcissists, Borderlines […]

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Assessing Attachment – Tips

Individuals with dismissive or detached attachment styles tend to idealise or minimise early difficulties; individuals with anxious avoidant/ambivalent attachment styles tend to be overwhelmed by their early adverse experiences with strong emotional responses in interview. Both styles indicate poor reflective functioning (capacity to think clearly). • Do not accept the first response, but be prepared […]

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Parental Alienation: How and When Does It Start?

During 40 years of being a child and adult psychiatrist, and 20 years as a forensic child psychiatrist, I discovered one of the unsavory ways automatic living plays out. This occurs in parental alienation (PA). Parental alienation begins long before divorce occurs. In this blog post, I will talk about why PA is prominent in divorce; the characteristics of alienating parents, […]

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Why does a coercive controller do it? A very secure Attachment

Responding to the conversation on cults and parental abduction and alienation, a UK parent has summarised her own story of being Alienated from her daughter. Starting the Alienation long before separating from her, her husband kept his daughter close. She was ‘his blood’. What makes this guest blog story so unusual is how much of her […]

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Attachment theory

Attachment theory began to take shape in the 50’s with the work of English psychiatrist, John Bowlby, and American pychologist, Mary Ainsworth. Attachment theory is based on the belief that the mother­ child (or caretaker) bond is the primary force in infant development. Bowlby’s premise was that the relationship between infant and the primary caretaker […]

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