Attachment Category

Attachment Styles in Adulthood

Studies of persons with borderline personality disorder, characterized by a longing for intimacy and a hypersensitivity to rejection, have shown a high prevalence and severity of insecure attachment. Attachment styles in adulthood have labels similar to those used to describe attachment patterns in children: Secure Anxious-preoccupied (high anxiety, low avoidance) Dismissing-avoidant (low anxiety, high avoidance) Fearful-avoidant (high anxiety, high […]

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Attachment

Bonding Attachment is the emotional bond that forms between infant and caregiver, and it is the means by which the helpless infant gets primary needs met. It then becomes an engine of subsequent social, emotional, and cognitive development. The early social experience of the infant stimulates growth of the brain and can have an enduring influence […]

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Attachment Styles

For readers unfamiliar with the theory, attachment styles are patterns of thinking, feeling, and behaving that maximize our abilities to establish and maintain connections to our significant others. In childhood, they are adaptations that enable children to adjust to whatever parental conditions they are born into. Secure Attachment. If parents are consistent, available, and responsive, their children […]

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ROLES IN THE ATTACHMENT-BASED PARENTAL ALIENATION DYNAMIC

In this role-reversal dynamic, the following roles are identified: Pathogenic parent: The parent who psychologically manipulates the child to devalue and discard the targeted parent. Targeted child: The child within a family system who has been singled out for the attention of the pathogenic parent. Targeted parent: The normal-range and affectionately available parent; the “victim” in the story. […]

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Attachment-based parental alienation

Attachment-based parental alienation is a complex and potentially harmful dynamic whereby a parent manipulates their children to avoid, reject, and disdain their other parent. It can be viewed as a symptom of the narcissistic paradigm and is often of clinical concern regarding the child’s healthy development. PARENTAL ALIENATION CHARACTERIZED Parental alienation may involve the following symptoms and manifestations: The […]

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The Dissociative Continuum

In the face of persisting threat, the infant or young child will activate otherneurophysiological and functional responses. This involves activation of dissociative adaptations. Dissociation is a broad descriptive term that includes a variety of mental mechanism involved in disengaging from the external world and attending to stimuli in the internal world. This can involve distraction, […]

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The Hyperarousal Continuum: ‘Fight or Flight’ Responses

Hippocampus: Another key system linked with the RAS and playing a central role in the fear response is the hippocampus, located at the interface between the cortex and the lower diencephalic areas. It plays a major role in memory and learning. In addition it plays a key role in various activities of the autonomic nervous […]

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Types of attachment

Approximately 15% of infants in low psychosocial risk and as many as 82% of those in high-risk situations do not use any of the three organized strategies for dealing with stress and negative emotion (9). These children have disorganized attachment. One recently identified pathway to children’s disorganized attachment includes children’s exposure to specific forms of […]

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Attachment

Parents play many different roles in the lives of their children, including teacher, playmate, disciplinarian, caregiver and attachment figure. Of all these roles, their role as an attachment figure is one of the most important in predicting the child’s later social and emotional outcome (1–3). Attachment is one specific and circumscribed aspect of the relationship […]

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The Early Attachment Experiences are the Roots of Psychopathy

This review proposes the ‘attachment and the deficient hemispheric integration hypothesis’ as explanation for psychopathy. The hypothesis states that since secure attachment to the parents is essential for the proper development of both the hemispheres in children, psychopaths with histories of neglect and abuse are unable to develop efficient interaction of both the hemispheres, important […]

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