Posted in Adult Children Of Psychopaths, Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma, Aftermath of Parental Alienation, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

I am divorcing a narcissist…

Accordingly to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, someone exhibiting five or more of the traits set out below can be suffering from a narcistic personality disorder:-

• A need for excessive attention and admiration.

• A sense of entitlement particularly to special treatment.

• A grandiose sense of self-importance.

• A pre-occupation of fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance, beauty or ideal love.

• A belief that one is special and can only be understood by or associated with special people or institutions.

• An exploitation of others.

• A lack of empathy.

• An envy of others or the belief that one is the object of envy.

• Arrogant behaviour or attitude. Continue reading “I am divorcing a narcissist…”

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Posted in A Narcissistic Parent, Abandoned Parents, Adult Children of Narcissists, Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma, Adultification, Aftermath of Parental Alienation, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Shared Parenting After Parental Separation: The Views of 12 Experts

This article summarizes panel discussions that took place at an international conference on shared parenting (SP) held in May 2017. The panelists were internationally recognized experts on the legal and psychological implications of custody arrangements and parenting plans. Seven broad themes dominated the discussions: whether or not there was persuasive evidence that SP provides real benefits to children whose parents separate; what specific factors make SP beneficial; what symbolic value SP might have; whether there should be a legal presumption in favor of SP, and if so, what factors should make for exceptions; whether high parental conflict, parents’ failure to agree on the parenting plan, or dynamics of parental alienation should preclude SP; and what should happen when a parent wants to relocate away from the other parent.

Continue reading “Shared Parenting After Parental Separation: The Views of 12 Experts”

Posted in Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma, How do you survive a narcissist father?, How to Heal From a Toxic Parent, HOW TO SURVIVE NARCISSISTIC ABUSE, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Recovery, Surviving, Surviving Parental Alienation!!, Toxic stress

People — whom we can safely call “toxic”

This general group of people — whom we can safely call “toxic” — might resent your progress for any number of reasons. Perhaps they think you’ll no longer be in their life if you improve too much. Maybe they feel like your improvement exposes their own shortcomings. Or perhaps they’re just threatened by the idea of change.

Word Art 15 (3)

The causes are less important than the effects, which can take the form of anger, resentment, frustration, manipulation or cruelty (or a debilitating combination thereof). At any given moment, you might be finding yourself dealing with toxic friends, family members or colleagues who — consciously or unconsciously — are sabotaging your happiness and growth. Identifying these individuals and understanding how to manage them is absolutely crucial to your well being, success and happiness. Continue reading “People — whom we can safely call “toxic””

Posted in #Pathogenic Parenting, Adult Children of Narcissists, Adult Children of Parental Alienation - Resources, Adult Children of Parental Alienation Syndrome:, Adult Children Of Psychopaths, Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Unlocking the Secrets of the Wounded Psyche

Daniela Sieff interviews Jungian analyst Donald Kalsched about the survival system a child develops to protect him or herself from psychological wounding, and discovers how that survival system can cause more damage than the original wound.

http://www.danielasieff.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Unlocking-the-Secrets-of-the-Wounded-Psyche-2008-JN-b..pdf

Posted in Adult children of Narcissistic parents, Adult Children of Narcissistic, Psychopathic, and Borderline Parents, Adult Children of Parental Alienation - Resources, Adult Children of Parental Alienation Syndrome:, Adult Children Of Psychopaths, Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma, Aftermath of Parental Alienation, Alienated children, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Working with the Intrapsychic Experience of the Alienated Child

As someone who works with alienated children almost daily, I know a lot about the subject of parental alienation. I read a lot about it as well as write about it but most of what I know comes direc…

Source: Working with the Intrapsychic Experience of the Alienated Child

Posted in Adult children do not recognise they are being alienated, Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma, Alienated Children are not taught to empathize, Alienated children psychopathic parent, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Psychoanalysis

Under the broad umbrella of psychoanalysis there are at least 22 theoretical orientations regarding human mental development[citation needed]. The various approaches in treatment called “psychoanalysis” vary as much as the theories do. The term also refers to a method of analysing child development.

The basic tenets of psychoanalysis include:

  1. a person’s development is determined by often forgotten events in early childhood rather than by inherited traits alone
  2. human attitude, mannerism, experience, and thought is largely influenced by irrational drives that are rooted in the unconscious
  3. it is necessary to bypass psychological resistance in the form of defense mechanisms when bringing drives into awareness
  4. conflicts between the conscious and the unconscious, or with repressed material can materialize in the form of mental or emotional disturbances, for example:neurosis, neurotic traits, anxiety, depression etc.
  5. liberating the elements of the unconscious is achieved through bringing this material into the conscious mind (via e.g. skilled guidance, i.e. therapeutic intervention).[3]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychoanalysis

Posted in Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma, How Trauma Changes The Brain, Parental Alienation PA, Parental childhood trauma, Post traumatic stress and related phenomena, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Parental Alienation, Post-traumatic Stress, Relational Treatment of Complex Trauma, Repairing the child-parent relationship after traumatic separation, alienation

Stopping time, blocking memory

There is a pain so utter that it swallows substance up
Then covers the abyss with trance—
So memory can step around—across—upon it
As one within a swoon goes safely where an open-eye would drop him—
—Bone by bone

~Emily Dickinson

Often people ask me what it means that they can’t remember much from childhood. I don’t know why they can’t remember, of course. But I do tell them my experience: that there is a huge range of remembrance of our pasts—from hardly recalling anything before mid-adolescence, to very detailed memories even when very young. Brains work a variety of ways and not knowing your past may be totally normal.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-power-your-past/201312/the-gift-disassociation

Posted in Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma, Parental Alienation PA

Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma

The popular press has reported many stories about adults who suddenly remember having been abused as children. Some media reports have emphasized the unusual circumstances or content of such recovered memories while other reports have declared that the “recovery” of memories of abuse is false for a variety of reasons. Little in the press, however, has dealt with the science relating to memories of childhood trauma.

Is it Possible to Forget Childhood Trauma?

People forget names, dates, faces and even entire events all the time. But is it possible to forget terrible experiences such as being raped? Or beaten? The answer is yes – under certain circumstances. For more than a hundred years, doctors, scientists and other observers have reported the connection between trauma and forgetting. But only in the past 10 years have scientific studies demonstrated a connection between childhood trauma and amnesia.

http://www.istss.org/public-resources/remembering-childhood-trauma.aspx