Posted in A Family’s Heartbreak, A lesson of life after her parents been divorced, A Solution To End ‘Parental Alienation’?, Abusive Narcissists Get Inside Your Head, Adult Child Estrangement, Parental Alienation, Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Quantifying the Degree of Interparental Conflict – the Spectrum Between Conflict and Forms of Maltreatment and Abuse

Interparental conflict is detrimental to the development of children. Only few methods for quantifying the degree of interparental conflict exist and this produces controversies about what is detrimental to child well-being and what is not. This is particularly critical in cases where there is a form of child abuse or maltreatment that cannot be diagnosed because of the lack of standards or criteria. The present study describes a method for quantifying the degree of interparental conflict on the basis of a generalizable measure which is scalable, robust, and reproducible. The method is developed on the data basis of a survey study, in which 1146 parents reported 46,720 items on the topic of hostile-aggressive parenting. The algorithm can estimate the degree of child abuse and child maltreatment which is particularly relevant for assessments of non-sexual forms of child maltreatment or abuse. The present methodology differs from classical psychometric approaches and available instruments in that its application yields the practically interpretable measure of a ‘loss of child well-being’ and that this measure can be dynamically adapted to child welfare standards changing in a society over the years. The approach identifies criteria which family courts or child welfare agencies should use for assessing interparental conflicts in a standardized and reproducible manner.

Continue reading “Quantifying the Degree of Interparental Conflict – the Spectrum Between Conflict and Forms of Maltreatment and Abuse”

Posted in Adult Child Estrangement, Deciding to Make Contact with the Estranged Person, Estranged Adult Children - The Heartbreak & Sorrow, Parental Alienation PA, Post Estrangement, Renate Dundys Marrello - Post Estrangement, Silence of Family Estrangement

When the Ties That Bind Unravel

When the Ties That Bind Unravel

“We live in a culture that assumes if there is an estrangement, the parents must have done something really terrible,” said Dr. Coleman, whose book “When Parents Hurt” (William Morrow, 2007) focuses on estrangement. “But this is not a story of adult children cutting off parents who made egregious mistakes. It’s about parents who were good parents, who made mistakes that were certainly within normal limits.”

Dr. Coleman himself experienced several years of estrangement with his adult daughter, with whom he has reconciled. Mending the relationship took time and a persistent effort by Dr. Coleman to stay in contact. It also meant listening to his daughter’s complaints and accepting responsibility for his mistakes. “I tried to really get what her feelings were and tried to make amends and repair,” he said. “Over the course of several years, it came back slowly.”

Therapists for years have listened to patients blame parents for their problems

Posted in Adult Child Estrangement, Deciding to Make Contact with the Estranged Person, Estranged Adult Children - The Heartbreak & Sorrow, Estranged Adult Children Part 1 of 2, Parental Alienation PA

Done With The Crying-by Sheri McGregor M.A. (Author)

Done With The Crying: Help and Healing for Mothers of Estranged Adult Children Paperback – May 3, 2016

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51cRtf49Q8L.SX331_BO1,204,203,200.jpg

Posted in Adult Child Estrangement, Deciding to Make Contact with the Estranged Person, Estranged Adult Children - The Heartbreak & Sorrow, Estranged Adult Children Part 1 of 2, estranged parent., Estrangement, Estrangement & Being Cut Off, ESTRANGEMENT FROM ADULT CHILDREN, Family Estrangement, Parental Alienation PA, parents of estranged adult children

If I’m no longer a mother, then what am I?

by Sheri McGregor, M.A.

It’s a question I hear often after an adult child’s estrangement. Among the more than 9,000 mothers who have answered my survey for parents of estranged adult children, or reached out in site comments or in emails, hundreds ask the same or a similar question.

Even the busiest mothers go out of their way for their adult children. Sometimes, mothers even say their lives revolved around them, as if they’ve been on-call.

For some, the question has layers of complexity that make the situation even more heartbreaking. Like when grandchildren are involved, which makes the loss even more cruel and sad.

Grandmothers picture the sweet, innocent faces of the grandchildren their estranged son or daughter has ripped away, and worry what awful picture is being painted about them. That they’re crazy? Or worse, that they don’t care? Those women may ask, if I’m no longer the devoted grandmother, always there and ready to help, then who am I?

read the full answer to this question and many more on this website:- http://www.rejectedparents.net/category/answers-to-common-questions/

Posted in Adult Child Estrangement

Difference, Choice, and Punishment: Parental Beliefs and Understandings about Adult Child Estrangement

This article reports on qualitative research that examined the experiences of 25 Australian participants aged over 60 years who were estranged from at least one adult child. When participants were asked about their perceptions of the cause of the estrangement they described events prior to and at the time of the estrangement, possibly perceived as a form of parental rejection or relational devaluation by the estranged children. Findings suggested a complex interplay of long-term factors that appeared to contribute to an eroded relationship between parents and children, including divorce, third-party alienation, and multiple family stressors. Ultimately participants said that the adult children responded by: (1) choosing what they perceived to be a less rejecting or less dangerous relationship over a relationship with their parent; (2) choosing to stop contact or reduce emotional interactions with their parent; or (3) using estrangement to punish their parent for the perceived rejection.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0312407X.2014.927897#.VRvqszGUeSo

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