Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Understanding suicide: getting help and support with suicidal thoughts

Challenge your thoughts

However bad you’re feeling, try to make a deal with yourself that you won’t act on those feelings today. Try to think of things you could look forward to, and make plans to do something you enjoy very soon. Then do something nice for yourself – even something small like watching your favourite film or TV show. And keep telling yourself you can get through this.

https://www.caba.org.uk/help-and-guides/information/understanding-suicide-getting-help-and-support-suicidal-thoughts

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Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

WITH HELP COMES HOPE – 100 Ways to Get Through the Next 5 Minutes

Sometimes it’s hard to see past the next second, much less the next 5 minutes. On our website, You Matter, one of our bloggers keeps a list handy of some things that help her calm down or distract her for just a little bit, so that she can eventually make it to a safe place where she can deal with her emotions. Click on the link below

http://lifelineforattemptsurvivors.org/100-ways-to-get-through-the-next-5-minutes/

Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Suicide and suicidal thoughts | Time To Change

https://www.time-to-change.org.uk/category/blog/suicide-and-suicidal-thoughts

Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

What makes someone think of suicide?

There is rarely a single thing that makes someone want to end their own life. Experts believe that a number of complex issues can make someone feel this way.

If someone is thinking about suicide, they often feel nothing will help with the problems that are making them feel suicidal.

Certain things can make someone more likely to think about suicide. These might include:

  • difficult life events – such as having a traumatic childhood or experiencing physical or emotional abuse,

Need practical advice & info? We can help.

Contact our Advice team about mental health & related issues

0300 5000 927Monday – Friday 9.30am – 4pm, not including bank holidays

https://www.rethink.org/carers-family-friends/what-you-need-to-know/suicidal-thoughts-how-to-support-someone/causes

Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Suicidal thoughts – how to support someone – Rethink Mental Illness, the mental health charity

This section covers:

  1. What makes someone think of suicide?
  2. What are the warning signs that someone feels suicidal?
  3. How can I help someone who is feeling suicidal?
  4. What services can help someone who is feeling suicidal?
  5. Are people with mental illness more likely to feel suicidal?
  6. Are self-harm and suicide linked?
  7. How can I get support?
  1. Continue reading “Suicidal thoughts – how to support someone – Rethink Mental Illness, the mental health charity”

Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Time to Talk Day 2019 | Time To Change

Mental health problems affect one in four of us, yet people are still afraid to talk about it. Time to Talk Day encourages everyone to talk about mental health.

Having conversations about mental health helps break down stereotypes, improve relationships, aid recovery and take the stigma out of something that affects us all. There are lots of different ways to have a conversation about mental health. And you don’t have to be an expert to talk.

However you do it, make sure you have a conversation about mental health this Time to Talk Day.

https://www.time-to-change.org.uk/get-involved/timetotalkday2019

Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Publications by Dr. L.F. Lowenstein

 Publications by Dr. L.F. Lowenstein on Parental Alienation Syndrome http://www.parental-alienation.info/index.html
108 Specific Treatment Approaches for Children who have Suffered from Parental Alienation 2013
107 The Family Courts What is an ideal Judgment 2013
106 Confessions of an Expert Witness in the case of PAS 2013
105 Do Children Have Rights Against the Psychological Effects of Parental Alienation 2013
104 The Long Term Effect of Parental Alienation in Childhood 2013
103 Implacable Hostility against Grandparents following Parental Separation and Divorce 2012
102 Finding a Real Solution to Complex Contact Disputes Due to Implacable Hostility Between Parents 2012
101 Am I a Controversial Psychologist? 2012
100 Treating the Long and Short Term Effects of Parental Alienation 2012
99 Why does mediation often fail with families in turmoil? 2012
98 Complex with Highly Complex Contact Disputes Between Parents 2012
97 One Expert Witness Attempting to Explain Families in Turmoil Leading to Parental Alienation 2012
96 What Can be Done With an Uncooperative Alienator? 2012
95 What Can Yet be Done With Older Children Who Have Been Long Term Victims of Parental Alienation? 2012
94 Is the concept of parental alienation a meaningful one? 2012
93 The Important Friendly Parent Doctrine and the Judiciary 2012
92 I Have A New Parent The Ensuing Problem Leading To Parental Alienation Scenarios 2012
91 Parental Alienation or not – is that the question? 2012
90 Should Parental Alienation be Considered a Crime? 2012
89 Is joint custody of children best following separation of parents 2012
88 The Alienated Parent Becoming a Stranger 2012
87 Can the attitude and behaviour of alienators be changed? How can this be achieved? 2012
86 The Parental; Alienator Who Abducts Children 2011
85 The Vicious Alienator’s Game Plan 2011
84 Understanding and treating children who have been alienated against a parent 2011
83 Angry Sadistic Alienators 2011
82 The Manipulative Alienator 2011
81 Can the role of the judiciary in family courts be improved 2011
80 What is in the Best Interest of the Children 2011
79 The value and limitation of mediation (ADR) (Post divorce disputes, concentrating on child contact issues) 2011
78 The Judiciary and Parental Alienation Disputes 2011
77 Post separation conflicts which affect contact for an alienated parent 2011
76 Parental alienation and child contact disputes in Pakistani families in the UK 2011
75 Infants and childen in danger of maltreatment due to domestic violence (the problem of violence in the home) 2011
74 The Judiciary in Family Courts (The need for making courageous decisions) 2011
73 The association of the judiciary and the expert witness in family contact disputes involving alienated children 2011
72 Assessment of Child Custody Disputes (using psychological testing and interview) 2011
71 The complexity of investigating possible sexual abuse of a child 2010
70 The effects on children in the future who have been successfully alienated against a parent 2010
69 How can the truthfulness of children making child sex allegations be established? 2010
68 Why are the courts unwilling to acknowledge PAS or PA 2010
67 What if the custodial parent refuses to co-operate with child contact decisions 2010
66 What if the alienated parent has faults 2010
65 Vital steps in treating the implacable hostility of the alienator 2010
64 The possibilities and limitations of psychological therapy in case of parental alienation 2010
63 The Judiciary and Parental Alienation Disputes 2010
62 The alienated psychologist 2010
61 Is the parent fit to parent a child 2010
60 How Can the Truthfulness of Children Making Child Sex Abuse Allegations be Established? 2010
59 Diagnosing Child Contact Disputes Between Parents (Are There Solutions?) 2010
58 Child Contact Disputes Between Parents and Allegations of Sex Abuse (What does the Research Say?) 2010
57 Can the judiciary do more? 2010
56
Contact Disputes to to Implacable Hostilities (A psychologist advises)
2009
55 Child Parent Contact Following Domestic Violence 2009
54
Parental-alienation – A potentially serious mental disorder
2009
53 Emotional abuse of children due to implacable hostility between parents? 2008
52 What is in the best interests of children? 2008
51
Attachment theory and Parental Alienation
2008
50
What can be done to reduce the implacable hostility leading to parental alienation between parents?
2008
49 Mediation with seperated parents – Recent research (2002-2007)  2007
48 Implacable hostility, parental alienation
2008
47
Obliterating Paternity
 2007
46 The comparison of parental alienation to the “Stockholm syndrome”
 2006
45
How Can Mediation be made to be Successful in Serious Family Disputes?
(Solving intractable hostility between former partners in contact disputes)
2006
44
My experiences in Courts of Law dealing with parental alienation cases
2006
43
When is it not a case of PA or PAS?
2006
42
Real Justice for non custodial parents and their children
2006
41
Parental Alienation Due to a Shared Psychotic Disorder (Folie a Deux)
2006
40
The Psychological Assessment and Treatment of Pathologically Induced Alienation
(Dealing with alienation leading to an induced phobic reaction)

2006
39
The Psychological Effect of Modelling (Imitation) on Parental Alienation
 2006
38
Dealing with Parental Post-Separation Conflicts (Recent Research)
2005
37
Understanding Post-Divorce Conflicts and How to Resolve Them (Recent Research)
2005
36
Attempting to Solve Child Contact Disputes (Recent Research)
2005
35
The Type of Remedial and Therapeutic Methods required in Parental Alienation
2005
34
Assessing and treatment of Parental Alienation
2005
33
Difficulties in treating parents and children who have been involved in the Parental Alienation process
2005
32
Family Courts (Where have courageous and just judges gone?) 
2005
31
How does one identify and treat false accusations of sexual abuse in Parental Alienation situations?
2005
30
How can one overturn the programming of a child against a parent?
2005
29
The Concept of Mediation
2005
28
Part 4 Dealing with treatment of PAS
2005
27
Part 3 Long term effects on children
2005
26
Part 2 PAS impact on children
2005
25
Part 1 PAS or PA is that the question
2005
24
Signs of PAS and how to counteract its effects
2005
23
Causes and associated features of divorce as seen by recent research
2005
22
The psychological effects and treatment of PAS
2005
21
Recent changes in PAS approach by the Judiciary
2005
20
Do children need fathers?
2004
19
Tackling Parental Alienation
2003
18
Treating Families in Turmoil
2002
17
Problems suffered by children due to the effects of PAS
2002
16
The psychological treatment of children who have suffered from PAS
2001
15
The value of mediation in child custody disputes
2001
14
Recent research into risk assessment of children
2001
13
How to make joint custody parenting work effectively
2001
12
Joint custody and shared parenting
2001
11
Tackling Parental Alienation
2001
10
Treating the alienator
2000
9
The role of mediation in child custody disputes
2000
8
Parental Alienation and the Judiciary
1999
7
Mediation in the legal profession
1999
6
Mediation – the way forward
1999
5
Parental Alienation Syndrome: What the legal profession should know
1999
4
Parental Alienation Syndrome (PAS)
1999
3
Child custody disputes – Ideals and realities
1998
2
Parental Alienation Syndrome
1998
1
Parent Alienation Syndrome: A two step approach toward a solution
Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

PARENTAL ALIENATION AND SUICIDE IN MEN

PARENTAL ALIENATION AND SUICIDE IN MEN
Leo Sher
James J. Peters Veterans’ Administration Medical Center and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai,

Possibly, a decrease in the number and intensity of parental alienation cases may reduce suicidality in men.
It is quite difficult to reduce the number and intensity of such cases. The alienating parent’s task is easy. The
playing field is not level. It is prejudiced in favor of the alienating parent (Bone 2012). We must simply recog-
nize this if it is to be overcome. Legal interventions may help. Dr. Ludwig F. Lowenstein, one of Britain’s most
quoted authorities on psychology in education wrote:

“The threat of punishment for the alienator must be supported by punishment, including removing the childLowenstein
from mother’s care to a neutral place or to the alienated parent, and to use incarceration when necessary. Failure
to carry out this distasteful, but necessary, action against the obdurate party would constitute a mockery of the
judicial system. It is my experience as an expert witness to the Courts as a forensic, clinical psychologist, that
most alienating parents, whether mothers or fathers, will obey a court order if punishment is threatened for fai-
lure to adhere to the ruling” (Lowenstein 1999). Education of legal and mental health professionals and the
general public may also help.

Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

If the cap fits!

read itif the cap fits

Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Is someone ‘orbiting’ you on social media?

After reading the article and finally having a concrete name for my experience, I discussed the trend with friends and found that most of them had experienced orbiting themselves, and not always from an ex-romantic partner. A few mentioned that they’d noticed friends and family members with whom they’d experienced a falling outwere “orbiting” them — interacting with their social media without communicating in a real, meaningful way.

My friend Megan recently had an argument with her cousin, but says she still sees her name popping up on Facebook and Instagram. “I’m sure we’ll resolve it soon enough, but it’s just interesting to me that we’re not speaking right now, for real reasons, but she’s still watching my Instagram stories and liking pretty much everything I post,” she says. “Maybe I’m overthinking it, but it’s definitely confusing.”

So why do we do this and are there any negative ramifications of being on the receiving end of this common behavior? Continue reading “Is someone ‘orbiting’ you on social media?”