making false statements to the police

Making a false report could lead to a fine, a conviction for wasting police time or even a prison sentence for the more serious offence of perverting the course of justice. The offence carries a maximum penalty of six months imprisonment.


It is an offence to give false information to the police. Section 5(2) of the Criminal Law Act 1967 provides: … This offence is punishable with up to 6 months imprisonment. Before a person can be prosecuted the consent of the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) is required.

What is a false or misleading statement?

A false statement is a statement that is not true. … A lie is a statement that is known to be untrue and is used to mislead. A false statement is a statement that is untrue but not necessarily told to mislead, as a statement given by someone who does not know it is untrue.

What is the maximum penalty for fabricating evidence?

Perjury and fabricating evidence are indictable offences with potential prison terms of up to 14 years, while obstruct justice under 139 (2) of the Criminal Code is an indictable offence with a maximum sentence of imprisonment for 10 years

false accusation is a claim or allegation of wrongdoing that is untrue and/or otherwise unsupported by facts.[1] False accusations are also known as groundless accusations or unfounded accusations or false allegations or false claims

When there is insufficient supporting evidence to determine whether it is true or false, an accusation is described as “unsubstantiated” or “unfounded”. Accusations that are determined to be false based on corroborating evidence can be divided into three categories:[2]

  • A completely false allegation, in that the alleged events did not occur.
  • An allegation that describes events that did occur, but were perpetrated by an individual who is not accused, and in which the accused person is innocent.
  • An allegation that is false, in that it mixes descriptions of events that actually happened with other events that did not occur.

A false allegation can occur as the result of intentional lying on the part of the accuser;[3][4] or unintentionally, due to a confabulation, either arising spontaneously due to mental illness[3] or resulting from deliberate or accidental suggestive questioning, or faulty interviewing techniques.[5] In 1997, researchers Poole and Lindsay suggested that separate labels should be applied to the two concepts, proposing that the term “false allegations” be used specifically when the accuser is aware that they are lying, and “false suspicions” for the wider range of false accusations in which suggestive questioning may have been involved.[6]

When a person is suspected of a wrongdoing for which they are in fact responsible, “false accusation may be used to divert attention from one’s own guilt”.[4] False accusation may also arise in part from the conduct of the accused, particularly where the accused engages in behaviors consistent with having committed the suspected wrongdoing, either unconsciously or for purposes of appearing guilty.[4]

Additionally, once a false accusation has been made – particularly an emotionally laden one – normal human emotional responses to being falsely accused (such as fear, anger, or denial of the accusation) may be misinterpreted as evidence of guilt.[citation needed]

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