Posted in Alienation, Pathological Lying

Reading is believing: The truth effect and source credibility

Five experiments explored how source reliability influences people’s tendency to rate statements as more credible when they were encountered earlier (the truth effect). Undergraduates read statements from one reliable source and one unreliable source. Statements read multiple times were perceived as more valid and were more often correctly identified on a general knowledge test than statements read once or not at all. This occurred at varying retention intervals whether the statements originated from a reliable or unreliable source, when people had little memory for the statements themselves or their source, and when the discrediting information about the sources came either before or after reading the facts. While repetition aided recognition and source accuracy, both were unaffected by the reliability of the source. Consistent with the source monitoring framework, familiarity may create an illusion of truth for statements when people lack source-specifying cues, especially cues regarding the reliability of the source.

Highlights

► We examine how people rate statements as more true after earlier exposure, despite not remembering reading them. ► Repetition influenced both perceived truthfulness and general knowledge, even when statements were not remembered. ► This truth effect occurs regardless of whether statements originated from a reliable or unreliable source. ► Familiarity creates an illusion of truth for information encountered earlier.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1053810011002200

Author:

Currently studying Psychotherapy , Cognitive psychology, Hypnotherapy. Qualified NLP practitioner and CBT therapist. REIKI Master. I believe in truth, honesty and integrity! ≧◔◡◔≦ https://www.linkedin.com/in/linda-turner-retreat/

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