Psychological Coercion

How Do They Work?

The tactics of psychological coercion often involve anxiety and stress, and fall into seven main categories.

  1. Restrictive techniques such as extended audio, visual, verbal, or tactile fixation, exhaustive, exact repetition of routine activities, sleep restriction, and/or social restriction.

  2. Establishment of control over the victim’s social environment, time, and sources of social support by creating social isolation; removing contact with family and friends who promote self-esteem, independence, positivity, and sense of well-being. Economic controls may contribute.

  3. Rejection of alternate information and separate opinions. Rules exist about permissible topics to discuss. Communication is highly controlled.

  4. Forcing the victim to re-evaluate the most central aspects of his or her experience of self and prior conduct in negative ways. The victim is made to feel like a “bad” person. Efforts are designed to destabilize and undermine the subject’s basic consciousness, reality awareness, world view, emotional control and defense mechanisms. The subject questions, doubts, and reinterprets his or her life and adopts a new “reality.”

  5. Creating a sense of powerlessness by subjecting the victim to intense and frequently confusing, conflicting actions and situations which undermine the victim’s self-confidence and judgment.

  6. Creating strong, aversive, emotional arousals in the subject by reactions such as intense humiliation, loss of privilege, social isolation, social status changes, intense guilt, anxiety, and manipulation.

  7. Intimidation of the victim by implied power, size, voice amplitude, or implied threat. Psychological coercion can be applied to such a degree that the victim’s capacity to make informed or free choices becomes inhibited. The victim becomes unable to make the normal, wise or balanced decisions which they most likely or normally would have made, had they not been manipulated. The cumulative effect of psychological coercion can be an even more effective form of undue influence than pain, torture, drugs or the use of physical force or threats

https://theneurotypical.com/psychological_coercion.html

1 Comments on “Psychological Coercion”

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