Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

What is an ACE?

What is an ACE?

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are any events that had a lasting negative impact on a child. There are countless potential examples. Some of the most common are:

  • Bullying
  • Domestic violence
  • Physical abuse
  • Sexual abuse
  • Traumatic grief
  • Community violence
  • Natural disasters
  • Medical trauma
  • Refugee trauma
  • Much more

While most parents do their best to protect their children from all of the above, they do not have control over all circumstances. Thus, even those who grew up in loving, functional families, may have suffered from significant ACEs.

ACEs can include events which may not seem so significant to adults but which significantly impact a child’s state of mind. Mockery from a sibling or parent, being told to stop crying, strong criticism, and more can all shape a child’s coping mechanisms. When treating childhood trauma later in life, many therapists advise clients to begin with these types of ACEs before moving onto the more bluntly traumatic events. This way, the individual can start reshaping their defense mechanisms before exposure to the most traumatic events in their lives.

How To Treat The Lifelong Effects Of Childhood Trauma

Author:

Currently studying Psychotherapy , Cognitive psychology, Biological psychology, Counselling psychology and CBT. I believe in truth, honesty and integrity! ≧◔◡◔≦

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