Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Karen, I have a quiz for you…

You claim to be an “expert” in this attachment-related family conflict pathology. Post your vitae, let’s have a look at the actual substance of your claimed “expertise” in attachment-related family pathology – or are you expecting to be “recognized as superior without commensurate achievements” – let’s have a look at your vitae, Karen.

You are the one who is so prominently claiming to be an “expert” – back it up, Karen, because I don’t believe you are an “expert” in anything – I suspect it’s simply a grandiose delusion.

Craig Childress, Psy.D.
Clinical Psychologist, PSY 18857

Dr. Craig Childress: Attachment Based "Parental Alienation" (AB-PA)

DSM-5 Narcissistic Personality Disorder Criterion 1:  “Has a grandiose sense of self-importance (e.g., exaggerates achievements and talents, expects to be recognized as superior without commensurate achievements).”



Karen Woodall, you assert that you are an “expert”… I have a quiz for you. 

You’re a mental health person, right?  So you should know symptom terms and definitions.  I have one for you.  I’ll describe the symptom and you give me the clinical term.  Ready, okay here:

The Symptom:  A fixed and false belief that is maintained despite contrary evidence.

What’s that called, Karen?

Right, a delusion.  I was pretty sure you’d get that one.  So here, let me give you a clinical application scenario and see how you do.

Say you have this person who thinks that they’re inventing something that will save the world, or that they’re making some earth-shattering new “discovery” but then it turns out that it’s not true. …

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My goodness, Karen Woodall is full of… nonsense.

A Vanishing Expertise
Tell me, who says you’re an “expert” Karen? You do.

Wait, I’ll bet Bill Bernet does too, doesn’t he. He says you’re an “expert.” But wait, who says Bill Bernet is an “expert”? Oh, you do. I get it. You all just go around anointing each other as “experts” and then just make stuff up. Sweet. You know that’s a scam, right? You’re not a real expert in anything. You know that, right?

You are? You are really an “expert” for real? Okay, show us. On your vitae. Post your vitae, Karen. Show us how you developed your expertise. Where did you receive your training in the attachment pathology? Where did you receive your training in family systems therapy? Where did you receive your training in personality disorder pathology? Where did you receive your training in complex trauma? Where did you receive your training in the neuro-development of the brain during childhood?

You’re not an expert in anything, Karen, except in your own imagination and fantasies. It’s a Fairy Tale, Karen.

Dr. Craig Childress: Attachment Based "Parental Alienation" (AB-PA)

Karen recently posted a blog about Fairy Tales and splitting that was kind of all over the place, but the central premise is that she’s some sort of expert on “splitting” and she’s sort of simultaneously discovering splitting and reporting on her discovery.

There’s so much nonsense being put forth, I need to address it.  But there’s so much to address, I’m going to do it in multiple posts.  This first one on just the general nonsense of her grandiosity, and then I’ll devote the second one to the more specific nonsense of what she says. 

Fairy Tales from the Woodalls

In her blog, Karen seemingly admits that her approach to understanding complex family conflict surrounding divorce is to create a fairy tale – a make-believe fairy talesstory she creates about a new form of pathology she thinks she’s “discovering.”

How exciting that must be for Karen, she thinks she’s discovering…

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Someone check on Karen, make sure she’s doing okay.

Karen Woodall is the most active obstructionist. This is because she has her personal finances at stake. She’s put all of her professional status into her Separation Clinic and drives the clinic’s marketing (her making money) by her being an “expert” in this new form of pathology. Apparently her husband, Nick, is in on this too, so it’s a whole family affair. If we return to the established knowledge of professional psychology – she’s no longer an expert and there goes all her marketing of herself and her clinic – and if we actually solve the pathology – there goes her entire clinic. Her entire world is built on her being an “expert” in a “new form” of pathology.

Neither one is true.

So she’s been the most active in scrambling to remain relevant by obstructing and creating confusion. To do this, she picks up on words or phrases I’m using and then mimics them, – but without meaning. She doesn’t really understand actual psychology – so she uses the terms but then kind of twists and distorts them into what she wants them to be. Sort of a, “Truth and reality are what I assert them to be” relationship with actual reality.

Dr. Craig Childress: Attachment Based "Parental Alienation" (AB-PA)

I’m worried about Karen Woodall’s psychological state, but I’m in Los Angeles.  Can someone over in England please check on her to make sure she’s okay.

Whenever I sign into my blog I get a newsfeed panel, and her blog has been showing up in this panel recently.  I typically don’t read them.  They’re just her own stuff without any scientific support.  She’s just making stuff up.  And as long as she’s basing her work on Gardnerian PAS, she’s pretty much irrelevant to any solution.  Gardnerian PAS prevents the solution.

But recently I’ve been attending to her, because we’re shifting into solutions that are grounded in actual knowledge, and as we do that the Gardnerians, particularly Karen, are seeking to sow confusion, co-opting terms and constructs that don’t apply to the PAS model, but then using them as a way of sowing confusion.  They want to pretend that there’s no…

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What makes you think we have time?

Understanding
That little girl misses her father. She’s lost him. Forever. Because the ignorant mental health people thought they had time. They didn’t. They were just ignorant, and because of that, she’s going to suffer for the rest of her life. Without escape. They took that from her.

What makes you think we have time? We need to fix things now. Today. Immediately. Love is always a good thing for a child to receive. Especially today.

Craig Childress, Psy.D.
Clinical Psychologist

Dr. Craig Childress: Attachment Based "Parental Alienation" (AB-PA)

I have a client.  A targeted parent father.  He so very much loved his daughter.  She’s nine.  Her mother created all sorts of barriers to the father’s love for his daughter.  Most recently was an effort by the mother to replace the father with her new boyfriend.

The father was set to actively fight for his love in court.  That’s why he contacted me, he wanted my help.  He has a very strong case. 

But then he had a massive stroke that left him paralyzed, conscious but not able to communicate.  It’s severe.  He’ll wind up dying eventually from this stroke and its aftermath, maybe six months, maybe a couple of years, but he’s not going to recover language or the ability to move.

What makes you think we have time?

My heart breaks for his daughter, the love of this dad’s life.  She will never know ever again, the…

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Millon’s brief description of personality disorders

ParanoidGuarded, defensive, distrustful and suspicious. Hypervigilant to the motives of others to undermine or do harm. Always seeking confirmatory evidence of hidden schemes. Feel righteous, but persecuted. Experience a pattern of pervasive distrust and suspicion of others that lasts a long time. They are generally difficult to work with and are very hard to form relationships with. They are also known to be somewhat short-tempered.[22][unreliable medical source?]
SchizoidApathetic, indifferent, remote, solitary, distant, humorless. Neither desire nor need human attachments. Withdrawn from relationships and prefer to be alone. Little interest in others, often seen as a loner. Minimal awareness of the feelings of themselves or others. Few drives or ambitions, if any. Is an uncommon condition in which people avoid social activities and consistently shy away from interaction with others. It affects more males than females. To others, they may appear somewhat dull or humorless. Because they don’t tend to show emotion, they may appear as though they don’t care about what’s going on around them.[23]
SchizotypalEccentric, self-estranged, bizarre, absent. Exhibit peculiar mannerisms and behaviors. Think they can read thoughts of others. Preoccupied with odd daydreams and beliefs. Blur line between reality and fantasy. Magical thinking and strange beliefs. People with schizotypal personality disorder are often described as odd or eccentric and usually have few, if any, close relationships. They generally don’t understand how relationships form or the impact of their behavior on others.[24]
AntisocialImpulsive, irresponsible, deviant, unruly. Act without due consideration. Meet social obligations only when self-serving. Disrespect societal customs, rules, and standards. See themselves as free and independent. People with antisocial personality disorder depict a long pattern of disregard for other people’s rights. They often cross the line and violate these rights.[25][unreliable medical source?]
BorderlineUnpredictable, manipulative, unstable. Frantically fears abandonment and isolation. Experience rapidly fluctuating moods. Shift rapidly between loving and hating. See themselves and others alternatively as all-good and all-bad. Unstable and frequently changing moods. People with borderline personality disorder have a pervasive pattern of instability in interpersonal relationships.[26][unreliable medical source?]
HistrionicDramatic, seductive, shallow, stimulus-seeking, vain. Overreact to minor events. Exhibitionistic as a means of securing attention and favors. See themselves as attractive and charming. Constantly seeking others’ attention. Disorder is characterized by constant attention-seeking, emotional overreaction, and suggestibility. Their tendency to over-dramatize may impair relationships and lead to depression, but they are often high-functioning.[27][unreliable medical source?]
NarcissisticEgotistical, arrogant, grandiose, insouciant. Preoccupied with fantasies of success, beauty, or achievement. See themselves as admirable and superior, and therefore entitled to special treatment. Is a mental disorder in which people have an inflated sense of their own importance and a deep need for admiration. Those with narcissistic personality disorder believe that they’re superior to others and have little regard for other people’s feelings.
AvoidantHesitant, self-conscious, embarrassed, anxious. Tense in social situations due to fear of rejection. Plagued by constant performance anxiety. See themselves as inept, inferior, or unappealing. They experience long-standing feelings of inadequacy and are very sensitive of what others think about them.[28][unreliable medical source?]
DependentHelpless, incompetent, submissive, immature. Withdrawn from adult responsibilities. See themselves as weak or fragile. Seek constant reassurance from stronger figures. They have the need to be taken care of by a person. They fear being abandoned or separated from important people in their life.[29][unreliable medical source?]
Obsessive–compulsiveRestrained, conscientious, respectful, rigid. Maintain a rule-bound lifestyle. Adhere closely to social conventions. See the world in terms of regulations and hierarchies. See themselves as devoted, reliable, efficient, and productive.
DepressiveSomber, discouraged, pessimistic, brooding, fatalistic. Present themselves as vulnerable and abandoned. Feel valueless, guilty, and impotent. Judge themselves as worthy only of criticism and contempt. Hopeless, suicidal, restless. This disorder can lead to aggressive acts and hallucinations.[30][unreliable medical source?]
Passive–aggressive (Negativistic)Resentful, contrary, skeptical, discontented. Resist fulfilling others’ expectations. Deliberately inefficient. Vent anger indirectly by undermining others’ goals. Alternately moody and irritable, then sullen and withdrawn. Withhold emotions. Will not communicate when there is something problematic to discuss.[31][unreliable medical source?]
SadisticExplosively hostile, abrasive, cruel, dogmatic. Liable to sudden outbursts of rage. Gain satisfaction through dominating, intimidating and humiliating others. They are opinionated and close-minded. Enjoy performing brutal acts on others. Find pleasure in abusing others. Would likely engage in a sadomasochist relationship, but will not play the role of a masochist.[32][unreliable medical source?]
Self-defeating (Masochistic)Deferential, pleasure-phobic, servile, blameful, self-effacing. Encourage others to take advantage of them. Deliberately defeat own achievements. Seek condemning or mistreatful partners. They are suspicious of people who treat them well. Would likely engage in a sadomasochist relationship.[32][unreliable medical source?]
Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Personality clusters

Personality clusters

The specific personality disorders are grouped into the following three clusters based on descriptive similarities:

Cluster A (odd or eccentric disorders)

Cluster A personality disorders are often associated with schizophrenia: in particular, schizotypal personality disorder shares some of its hallmark symptoms, e.g., acute discomfort in close relationships, cognitive or perceptual distortions, and eccentricities of behavior, with schizophrenia. However, people diagnosed with odd-eccentric personality disorders tend to have a greater grasp on reality than those diagnosed with schizophrenia. Patients suffering from these disorders can be paranoid and have difficulty being understood by others, as they often have odd or eccentric modes of speaking and an unwillingness and inability to form and maintain close relationships. Though their perceptions may be unusual, these anomalies are distinguished from delusions or hallucinations as people suffering from these would be diagnosed with other conditions. Significant evidence suggests a small proportion of people with Cluster A personality disorders, especially schizotypal personality disorder, have the potential to develop schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. These disorders also have a higher probability of occurring among individuals whose first-degree relatives have either schizophrenia or a Cluster A personality disorder.[17]

Cluster B (dramatic, emotional or erratic disorders)

Main article: Cluster B personality disorders

Cluster C (anxious or fearful disorders)

Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

How Much Abuse Should a Child Have to Take?

The Cafcass Case Manager at the time composed a report which found that the ‘resident parent’ was exhibiting “alienating behaviours.” Furthermore, the children were being exposed to emotional abuse, and that it needed to stop.

However, as the case continued, Cafcass were unable to provide any effective means to stop the harm being inflicted on the children, despite their own findings. Quite remarkably, rather than taking any pro-active approach to minimise the abuse, Cafcass went into great detail outlining the long-term detrimental effects on the children should the abuse be allowed to continue.

It took a whole year for a psychological report to be requested and the whole family was assessed over a period of several months.

The report was a damning indictment of the resident parent’s emotional abuse of the children. The clinical psychologist’s findings were that the children were being exposed to significant emotional harm in the toxic home environment with Joe’s ex-partner. The psychologist made reference to the term ‘significant emotional harm’ no less than seven times in the report. https://btgdad.com/2019/01/14/how-much-abuse-should-a-child-have-to-take/