Posted in Alienation

Parents’ Untreated Mental Illnesses Affect Their Children – The MGH Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds

We wrote earlier this month about the growing acceptance of psychiatric illness among the general population. A number of studies demonstrate that more and more Americans are accepting psychiatric illnesses as equal to other illnesses, and therefore actively seeking treatment. However, this increased need adds to the already existing challenge of finding adequate mental health …

Source: Parents’ Untreated Mental Illnesses Affect Their Children – The MGH Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds

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Children Of Parents With Mental Illness

When both parents are mentally ill, the chance is even greater that the child might become mentally ill. The risk is particularly strong when a parent has one or more of the following: bipolar disorder, an anxiety disorder, ADHD, schizophrenia, an alcohol or drug use disorder, or depression. Continue reading “Children Of Parents With Mental Illness”

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15-23% of children live with a parent with a mental illness

Prevalence of psychopathology in children of parents with mental illness and/or addiction: an up to date narrative review.

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Children of parents with a mental illness and/or addiction are at high risk for developing a mental illness themselves. Parental mental illness is highly prevalent leading to a serious number of children at high risk. The aim of this review is to give an up-to-date overview of psychopathology in children of parents with various mental illnesses and/or addiction, based on recent literature.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Worldwide, 15-23% of children live with a parent with a mental illness. These children have up to 50% chance of developing a mental illness. Parental anxiety disorder sets children at a more specific risk for developing anxiety disorder themselves, where children of parents with other mental illnesses are at high risk of a large variety of mental illnesses. Although preventive interventions in children of mentally ill parents may decrease the risk of problem development by 40%; currently, these children are not automatically identified and offered help.

SUMMARY:

This knowledge should encourage mental health services to address the needs of these children which requires strong collaboration between Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services and Adult Mental Health Services. Directions for further research would be to include both parents, allow for comorbidity and to look deeper into a broader variety of mental illnesses such as autism and personality disorder other than borderline. Continue reading “15-23% of children live with a parent with a mental illness”

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The ego state model

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In TA terms, we introject, or take in, our parents and keep a psychological copy of them for future reference. 

Often, this helps us to take in useful rules and regulations, knowledge about the world, how to look after ourselves and other people, etc. However, if our parents gave us the “wrong” information, or lived by not-very-useful rules themselves we end up introjecting something that doesn’t work particularly well for us later on.

Continue reading “The ego state model”

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The Psychology Of Relationships Symbiosis

Symbiosis is a concept which helps to explain one type of unhealthy relationship. The term symbiosis comes from biology, where it is used to describe two organisms working together for mutual benefit and, in the process, acting as one. Continue reading “The Psychology Of Relationships Symbiosis”

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Narcissistic Parents–Buying Off Their Children

To keep his/her children quiet and in control, narcissistic parents who have the means often use money and generous gifts as a way of buying off their children. This becomes a way of life for them. Money is used in exchange for love. Some children of narcissists go along with these manipulations; others recognize that their parent(s) is incapable of genuinely loving them. The narcissistic parent makes empty promises that are never kept. Some children remain tied to the narcissistic parent in a psychologically parasitic relationship. These children never grow up and realize their potential. They spend their lives waiting for something that will never come—genuine love. In exchange they accept the narcissistic parent(s) gifts, material largess and special privileges of being part of the familial inner circle.

Continue reading “Narcissistic Parents–Buying Off Their Children”

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Parents ‘control’ their children in one of 2 ways — and only one leads to happier kids

A study from University College London found that people who perceived their parents as less psychologically controlling and more caring as they were growing up were likely to be happier and more satisfied as adults.

On the flip side, the people whose parents applied greater psychological control as they were growing up exhibited significantly lower mental well-being throughout their adult lives; in fact, the effect was judged to be similar to the recent death of a close friend or relative. Continue reading “Parents ‘control’ their children in one of 2 ways — and only one leads to happier kids”

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Should You Confront a Narcissist about their Narcissism?

This is not the case with NPD. The whole crux of the condition is built on the premise that, for the narcissist, other people do not really exist except to serve the narcissist and prop up their false image of themselves. Not having individuated as people, narcissists believe the world revolves around them and is intensely interested in them. In believing this they are especially harmful people, and cause untold damage to their children in particular.

Word Art 15 (4)

Once an adult child has discovered that the eccentric and toxic behaviors of their parent is due to NPD, there can be an overwhelming urge to confront the parent who has caused them so much pain with the fact that there is something psychologically wrong with them. Continue reading “Should You Confront a Narcissist about their Narcissism?”

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How to Deal With a Narcissist: 5 Secrets Backed by Research

1) The Quick Answer: Don’t

2) Kiss Up or Shut Up

3) Know What You Want and Get Payment Up Front

4) Ask Them, “What Would People Think?”

5) Be Dexter

Word Art 15 (5)

Continue reading “How to Deal With a Narcissist: 5 Secrets Backed by Research”

Posted in Alienation

Should You Confront a Narcissist about their Narcissism?

This is not the case with NPD. The whole crux of the condition is built on the premise that, for the narcissist, other people do not really exist except to serve the narcissist and prop up their false image of themselves. Not having individuated as people, narcissists believe the world revolves around them and is intensely interested in them. In believing this they are especially harmful people, and cause untold damage to their children in particular.Word Art 15 (1)

Once an adult child has discovered that the eccentric and toxic behaviors of their parent is due to NPD, there can be an overwhelming urge to confront the parent who has caused them so much pain with the fact that there is something psychologically wrong with them. Continue reading “Should You Confront a Narcissist about their Narcissism?”