Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Neurauter pleads guilty to first-degree murder in wife’s killing engaged in a long-term campaign of parental alienation

Part of Lloyd Neurauter’s admission in a hearing Friday morning in Steuben County Court was that he had engaged in a long-term campaign of parental alienation, manipulating daughter Karrie Neurauter in believing that he was the good, trustworthy parent and that her mother was unstable.

He also admitted to threatening to kill himself if Karrie, who has already pleaded guilty to assisting in the killing, did not go along with his plans.

Baker said that creates the possibility, which he is open to, of revisiting Karrie’s plea agreement and reducing the charge to manslaughter, given the level of mental manipulation Lloyd Neurauter admitted to.

Lloyd Neurauter, with the assistance of his daughter Karrie Neurauter, killed Michele in 2017 and disguised her death as a suicide.

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Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Two Classic Cases of Courts Failing Alienated Parents

Cases in which the alienating parent continues to denigrate the ex-spouse.

Some alienating spouses continue to inculcate fear and dislike of the other parent even after contact with the alienated parent has been restored.

3) Cases in which the impacts of the alienation are so extreme.

In these cases, the child is likely to need a significant period of time, and most likely therapy as well, to break through the distorted belief system that has been inculcated.

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Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Role Of Mental Health Professionals In Parental Alienation Cases

Alienating parents tend to have difficulty separating their own feelings from those of the child (Johnston, Walters, & Olesen, 2005 referring to their study of alignment). This blurring of boundaries is typically an expression of the pathological enmeshment found within parental alienation cases. That is, the alienating parent will be angry with the other parent, and will project this anger onto the child, truly not realizing they are doing so. This projected anger will be absorbed by the child who eventually will become alienated because of it. Generally, when a parent is focused on his or her anger at the other parent, children are more likely to experience increased hostility, inconsistent discipline, or withdrawal by the parent (Grych, 2005). However, when this anger and hostility exists within the context of alienation, the damage is much greater to the child. Under this scenario, the child tends to merge with the alienating parent as a survival mechanism and the evaluator must be aware of this dynamic and be able to identify it. This again, goes back to the concept of pathological enmeshment which is axiomatic to the alienating parent-alienated child relationship. One can simply not have alienation without it.

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Parental Alienation: Hostile Aggressive Parenting

“Parental alienation (or Hostile Aggressive Parenting) is a group of behaviors that are damaging to children’s mental and emotional well-being, and can interfere with a relationship of a child and either parent. These behaviors most often accompany high conflict marriages, separation or divorce…These behaviors whether verbal or non-verbal, cause a child to be mentally manipulated or bullied into believing a loving parent is the cause of all their problems, and/or the enemy, to be feared, hated, disrespected and/or avoided.”

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Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Parental Alienation – Dr. L.F. Lowenstein – The mental state of parents who seriously abuse children through alienation

The mental state of parents who seriously abuse children through alienation

The experiment which follows is based on 15 years of study of alienating parents and having measured their personality traits in three areas: psychoticism, neuroticism, and empathy. The test used for this purpose was the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire which already has norms for the average population based on age and sex.

Although the sample is small consisting of 15 women and 10 men who have been found to seriously alienate their children against the other party, it is at present the only study carried out to measure objectively the personality traits of such individuals compared with the norms on psychoticism, neuroticism and empathy.

The tables which follow provides the norms and standard deviations of the non alienating normal group and compares this with the alienators on the three dimensions measured.

1. Psychoticism

Table 1

Psychoticism – age norms, means and standard deviations for different age groups for the general population, and parental alienating group (in brackets)

The results indicate that alienators appear to have a higher score on psychoticism indicating signs of mental illness of disturbance related to these symptoms.

2. Neuroticism

Table 2

Neuroticism – age norms, means and standard deviations for different age groups for the general population, and parental alienation group (in brackets)

3. Empathy

Table 3

Empathy – age norms, means and standard deviations for different age groups for the general population, and parental alienation group (in brackets)

Results

The results indicate that:

1. Alienators appear to have a higher score on psychoticism and neuroticism indicating signs of mental illness or emotional disturbance related to these symptoms.

2. Alienators also appear to have a lower score in the area of empathy than the norm of men and women assessed in the general population in the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Manual.

http://www.parental-alienation.info/publications/54-PASeriousMentalDisorder.htm

Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Folie à Deux – Shared Psychotic Disorder

Folie à deux is a shared psychotic disorder where the delusion is shared between two individuals.

Criteria for a folie à deux as described by Dewhurst and Todd:

  • definite evidence that the partners had been in intimate association
  • a high degree of commonality in the content of delusion, although the formal psychosis may differ
  • unequivocal evidence that the partners share support, and accept each other’s delusions

In the DSM -5 it is included under the section on psychotic disorders and does not exist as a separate entity.

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Posted in Parental Alienation & Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Shared Psychotic Disorder: Background and Criteria, History, Subtypes and Characteristics

Shared psychotic disorder, or folie à deux, is a rare delusional disorder shared by 2 or, occasionally, more people with close emotional ties. An extensive review of the literature reveals cases of folie à trois, folie à quatre, folie à famille (all family members), and even a case involving a dog. [1]

In the most recent update to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), shared psychotic disorder was removed as a separate disease entity and was included in the section on other specified schizoprenic spectrum and other psychotic disorders. In the updated version the entity exists as “delusional symptoms in partner of individual with delusional disorder.” [2] According to the DSM-5, in the context of a relationship, the delusional material from the dominant partner provides content for delusional belief by the individual who may not otherwise entirely meet criteria for delusional disorder.

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What Is a Shared Psychotic Disorder?

Shared psychotic disorders can also happen in groups of people who are closely involved with a person who has a psychotic disorder (called folie à plusiers, or “the madness of many”). For instance, this could happen in a cult if the leader is psychotic and his or her followers take on their delusions.

Experts don’t know why it happens. But they believe that stress and social isolation play a role in its development.

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Social Services were like the SS of Nazi Germany

suesspiciousminds

It won’t be the first time anyone in family cases has heard that comparison, but it is certainly the first time I’ve heard it from a Judge.

I’m very grateful to Ian from Forced Adoption for bringing this story to my attention. It arises from an appeal in Sheffield Crown Court from a criminal trial, where a father was convicted of harassing a school.

The conviction was upheld on appeal but the Judge was extremely sympathetic to the father and extremely critical of the social workers and social work that had put him in that position.

We don’t have a judgment in this case – you’d only really get a judgment in a criminal case if it was a criminal Court of Appeal decision, otherwise you just get judicial summing up and sentencing remarks, which are not generally published. I don’t know whether the Ministry of Justice will publish these…

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Hare Psychopathy Checklist – define, person, people, used, personality, score, traits, Definition, Purpose

The Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) is a diagnostic tool used to rate a person’s psychopathic or antisocial tendencies. People who are psychopathic prey ruthlessly on others using charm, deceit, violence or other methods that allow them to get with they want. The symptoms of psychopathy include: lack of a conscience or sense of guilt, lack of empathy, egocentricity, pathological lying, repeated violations of social norms, disregard for the law, shallow emotions, and a history of victimizing others.

Originally designed to assess people accused or convicted of crimes, the PCL-R consists of a 20-item symptom rating scale that allows qualified examiners to compare a subject’s degree of psychopathy with that of a prototypical psychopath. It is accepted by many in the field as the best method for determining the presence and extent of psychopathy in a person.

The Hare checklist is still used to diagnose members of the original population for which it was developed— adult males in prisons, criminal psychiatric hospitals, and awaiting psychiatric evaluations or trial in other correctional and detention facilities. Recent experience suggests that the PCL-R may also be used effectively to diagnose sex offenders as well as female and adolescent offenders.

Read more: http://www.minddisorders.com/Flu-Inv/Hare-Psychopathy-Checklist.html#ixzz5UAs0OA3i

http://www.minddisorders.com/Flu-Inv/Hare-Psychopathy-Checklist.html