FAQ

Q – How do you decide which subjects to post on?

A – I work from key search words on my site, and questions people ask via the site or social media. Sometimes it could be something I am working on with a client that I think may be of interest.

Q – Are you posting continuously through the day and night, some of your posts appear very early in the morning?

A – I wish I had the time, no. The majority of my posts are created, grouped together on similar subjects and scheduled through the WordPress calendar so they arrive at various times in the day throughout the world. Many of our readers are in the USA.

Q – Are you still giving free consultations?

A – No sorry thing’s have been so hectic recently and I was spending hours on WhatsApp, Skype, Zoom and Facetime. However; I am happy to offer just 1 hours consultation, you can see my rates on the payment page, to be paid in advance through PayPal.

Q – Do you do group sessions?

A – I tried earlier this year with the PARENTAL ALEINATION RECOVERY PROGRAMME, but with focused therapy and counselling you need to study a persons words, responses, body language and tone to be effective. Everyone’s needs and situation are unique and requires 1 to 1 attention.

Q – How long have you been alienated?

A – I think now my children are adults and have the choice, I no longer refer to my situation as alienation. But the situation has been going on for over 30 years now.

Q – At what stage did you realise your situation was PA?

A – Not for some time, it started back in 1991, and there was little information around and the internet was relatively new. I had some Therapy in 1995 and began studying Psychology online, then I realised it was more than Estrangement.

Q – Did you get much help and support from Social Services?

A – NO, they did not appear to recognise PA and many of their staff are young with no children and fresh out of University with no life experience. Nothing much has changed!!!!

Q – What resources did you use back then to educate yourself on PA?

A – Dr Ludwig F.Lowenstein M.A., Dip. Psych., Ph.D. who sadly is no longer with us wrote some excellent articles on PA, some of which can still be found on this site. He was one of the first.

https://parentalalienation-pas.com/category/experts/dr-ludwig-lowenstein/

Not forgetting Pete Walker author of the most popular book, Complex PTSD: From Surviving to Thriving who I came across in 2015. He has been working as a counselor, lecturer, writer and group leader for thirty-five years, and as a supervisor and consultant of other therapists for over 20 years. You can find many of Pete Walkers original posts under experts https://parentalalienation-pas.com/category/experts/pete-walker/

Another useful resources I found and worked through for over 4 years is Peter K. Gerlach, M.S.W. January 27th 1938 – October 22, 2015  who wrote ” Whos running your life?

“My life purpose is to educate and motivate other people to protect future generations and break the toxic [wounds + unawareness] cycle that is crippling many persons, families, and our society.” Peter K. Gerlach.

He was one of the pioneers working on IFS Internal Family Systems over 30 years ago.

I discovered his work back in 1994!

Q – How and why do you do Therapy and Counselling work?

A – 4 years ago when things went wrong yet again with a family member I decided to dig deeper into the psychology of PA which lead me to qualify as a Counsellor and Therapist. I am now using my knowledge, skills, experience and qualifications to help others with trauma and emotional abuse both online and 1 to 1.

You need to go through your own healing journey in order to do this work effectively. I love the work I do now, and enjoy watching my clients heal and go on to lead a happy and healthy life, with or without their children.

Its a never ending journey for me.

Linda – Always by your side

Evidence-based Therapies- What does it mean

New Harbinger’s books offer techniques drawn from the most well-researched, proven-effective therapeutic models available, and are written by the foremost experts in psychology. Our editorial team ensures each book is accessible and useful to those who need them most—regular people who are either struggling with physical or mental health conditions themselves or searching for help for their loved ones. Here are a few of the therapies our authors use.

CBT        ACT         DBT         MBSR          MBCT          CFT

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

  1. Master’s degree or above in a mental health discipline;
  2. Permanent professional license in home state, including having passed the state licensing exam in your mental health discipline;
  3. Completion of TF-CBTWeb;
  4. Participation in a live TF-CBT training (two days) conducted by a treatment developer or an approved national trainer (graduate of our TF-CBT Train-the-Trainer Program); or
    Live training in the context of an approved national, regional, or state TF-CBT Learning Collaborative of at least six months duration in which one of the treatment developers or a graduate of our TF-CBT Train-the-Trainer (TTT) Program has been a lead faculty member;
  5. Participation in follow-up consultation or supervision on a twice a month basis for at least six months or a once a month basis for at least twelve months. The candidate must participate in at least nine out of the twelve consultation or supervisory sessions. This consultation must be provided by one of the treatment developers or a graduate from our TTT program. Supervision may be provided by one of the treatment developers, a graduate of our TTT program, or a graduate of our TF-CBT Train-the-Supervisor (TTS) Program (In the latter instance, the supervisor must be employed at the same organization as the certification candidate);
    or
    Active participation in at least nine of the required cluster/consultation calls in the context of an approved TF-CBT Learning Collaborative;
  6. Completion of three separate TF-CBT treatment cases with three children or adolescents with at least two of the cases including the active participation of caretakers or another designated third party (e.g., direct care staff member in a residential treatment facility)
  7. Use of at least one standardized instrument to assess TF-CBT treatment progress with each of the above cases;
  8. Taking and passing TF-CBT Therapist Certification Program Knowledge-Based Test.

https://www.tfcbt.org/tf-cbt-certification-criteria/

What to Look for in a Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapist

Look for a licensed mental health professional with specialized training and experience in cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy as well as further training and supervised experience in trauma-focused therapy. In addition to these credentials, it is important to find a therapist with whom you and your child feel comfortable working.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapy-types/trauma-focused-cognitive-behavior-therapy

Somatic Therapy

Somatic therapy is a form of body-centered therapy that looks at the connection of mind and body and uses both psychotherapy and physical therapies for holistic healing. In addition to talk therapy, somatic therapy practitioners use mind-body exercises and other physical techniques to help release the pent-up tension that is negatively affecting your physical and emotional wellbeing.

When It’s Used

Somatic therapy can help people who suffer from stressanxietydepressiongriefaddiction, problems with relationships, and sexual function, as well as issues related to trauma and abuse. Those for whom traditional remedies have not been helpful for chronic physical pain, digestive disorders and other medical issues may also benefit from somatic therapy. Somatic therapy techniques can be used in both individual and group therapy settings.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapy-types/somatic-therapy

PSYCHOLOGICAL TREATMENTS APA

The purpose of this part of the website is to provide information about effective treatments for psychological diagnoses. The website is meant for a wide audience, including the general public, practitioners, researchers, and students. Basic descriptions are provided for each psychological diagnosis and treatment. In addition, for each treatment, the website lists key references, clinical resources, and training opportunities.

The American Psychological Association has identified “best research evidence” as a major component of evidence-based practice (APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice, 2006). The pages in the blue pull down bar above describe research evidence for psychological treatments, which will necessarily be combined with clinician expertise and patient values and characteristics in determining optimum approaches to treatment.

Below is an alphabetized list of psychological treatments. Please note that the absence of a treatment for a particular diagnosis does not necessarily suggest the treatment does not have sufficient evidence. Rather, it may indicate that the treatment has not been thoroughly evaluated by our team according to empirically-supported treatment criteria. Click on a treatment to view a description, research support, clinical resources, and training opportunities. Or, if you prefer, you may search treatments by diagnosis. You may also review treatments that may be appropriate for certain case presentations in the case studies section.

Please note, the following treatments have been evaluated to determine the strength of their evidence base; results are listed within each page. The treatments listed below have evidence ratings ranging from “strong” to “insufficient evidence”; click within each treatment to determine its rating.

Continue reading “PSYCHOLOGICAL TREATMENTS APA”

What is Evidence-Based Therapy

Evidence-Based Therapy (EBT), more broadly referred to as evidence-based practice (EBP), is any therapy that has shown to be effective in peer-reviewed scientific experiments. According to the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, evidence-based practice is characterized by an:

“[a]dherence to psychological approaches and techniques that are based on scientific evidence”.

The American Psychiatric Association and the American Psychological Association both consider EBT/EBP to be:

“‘best practice’ and one of the ‘preferred’ approaches for the treatment of psychological symptoms”.

In relevant literature, evidence-based medicine has also been defined as the:

“conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients”

(Sackett et al., 1996).

https://positivepsychology.com/evidence-based-therapy/

Gold Standard Therapies

PTSD treatments generally fall into two broad categories: past-focused and present-focused (or their combination) [4]. Past-focused PTSD models ask clients to explore their trauma in detail to promote “working through” or processing of painful memories, emotions, beliefs and/or body sensations about the trauma. In contrast, present-focused PTSD models focus on psychoeducation and coping skills to improve current functioning in domains such as interpersonal, cognitive, and behavioral skills. Examples of past-focused models include Prolonged Exposure (PE) Therapy, Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT), Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), and Narrative Exposure Therapy. Examples of present-focused models include Cognitive Therapy for PTSD, Seeking Safety, and Stress Inoculation Training. Thus far, the preponderance of evidence indicates that both types (past- and present-focused) work, and neither consistently outperforms the other in terms of outcomes based on RCTs [3]. The majority of RCTs have focused on past-focused models, however, thus leading to the term “gold standard therapies” for models such as PE, CPT and EMDR (e.g. [5]).

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4447050/

Evidence Based Therapies

Is (brainspotting/somatic experiencing therapy/hypnosis/neuro-linguistic programming/equine therapy/art therapy/thought field therapy/rapid resolution therapy) an evidence-based treatment for PTSD? No. These are not evidence-based. You can certainly try them! Some things may work for you, individually, that have not yet been studied sufficiently in scientific research. Generally, it probably makes sense to at least begin with one of the therapies with the most scientific support (PE, CPT, or EMDR) before investing your time, money, and energy into other forms of therapy.

If you have PTSD, I encourage you to seek out a professional who is committed to evidence-based treatment, and is well-trained in PE, CPT, or EMDR. If you haven’t had these treatments yet, know that you shouldn’t give up hope.

https://www.anxietytraumaclinic.com/post/ptsd-series-evidence-based-psychotherapy

Evidence-Based Psychotherapy

There are a few psychotherapies with evidence for reducing PTSD. Only three are strongly recommended according to evidence-based treatment guidelines:

  • Prolonged Exposure (PE)
  • Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT)
  • Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)

If you are struggling with symptoms of PTSD, you need one of these treatments.

Prolonged Exposure is a very effective treatment for PTSD, and is my personal treatment of choice. PE involves revisiting the traumatic experience in a safe and supportive environment so that you can finally emotionally process the trauma. This revisiting happens in a therapeutic manner designed to help you heal. Conversations including discussing your perspectives about the trauma and considering new meaning that comes through revisiting the memory. Over time, when the trauma is processed enough, the memories don’t “burn to the touch” as much, so to speak. That can often lead to profound shifts in the way you feel on a day-to-day basis. PE usually takes 10-16 sessions or so.

Cognitive Processing Therapy is another evidence-based treatment for PTSD. CPT focuses much more on your thinking about the trauma. Through CPT, you will primarily discuss the meaning you have taken from the traumatic experience. Your therapist will help you think through different “stuck points” in your thinking about the event(s). Then, they will teach you skills to help you think through these “stuck points” on your own in the future. CPT generally takes around 12 sessions.

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing is evidence-based for PTSD, is extremely popular among therapists in many communities, and is highly controversial among trauma researchers. This treatment involves revisiting the traumatic memory while engaging in back-and-forth eye movements. It may involve another form of bilateral stimulation (such as an alternating buzzer in each hand).

Also, lots of people are doing EMDR who aren’t well-trained in PTSD more generally. Its explosion in popularity has made it hard to know if you’re actually getting good care. EMDR should also only take around 6-12 sessions. Many therapists will “weave EMDR in” to a much longer course of treatment, which is not usually necessary. That said, EMDR should work – and it’s usually fairly easy to find a therapist trained in it!

https://www.anxietytraumaclinic.com/post/ptsd-series-evidence-based-psychotherapy

Brain Mapping

Last month, the Sunday Timespublished a sensationalist article about a London clinic called Brainworks that offers therapy based on EEG feedback – “£1,320 for the standard 12 sessions.” Similar clinics can be found around the world. “Those who have tried it swear it offers inner transformation,” wrote journalist Jini Reddy, “a profound lessening of anxieties, awakened states, feelings of elation and the focused, clear, calm mind more readily accessed through years of effortful practices.”

EEG (electroencephalography) records the waves of electrical activity emitted by your brain. The basic idea of neurofeedback therapy is that you have the frequency of these waves shown to you, via sounds or images, so that you can learn to exert some control over them.

Anyone reading the Sunday Times article could be forgiven for thinking they’d been transported to the 60s and 70s. Back then, companies with futuristic names like Zygon Corporation cashed in on the discovery that experienced meditators show high levels of alpha brave-waves (8 to 12 Hz) when they are in a meditative trance. You could buy a home EEG kit from one of these outfits and teach your brain to achieve this state of “alpha consciousness.”

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/brain-myths/201302/read-paying-100-neurofeedback-therapy